Can you tell me what colon and rectal cancers are? Are they more common in women?

Abnormal colon mass. Colorectal cancers are the second leading cause of death in women next to heart disease. You should check for rectal bleeding at age 40 and yearly there after. You should have a colonoscopy at age 50. Depending on the findings, you should have a colonoscopy 3 years, 5 years or 10 years thereafter until age 80: if family history, late 30s or early 40s.
No. Slightly more common in men. Malignant cells airing in the colon or rectum which can grow rapidly, cause obstruction, bleed, or metastasize. Require surgical removal.
Colorectal cancer is. The abnormal growth of cells from the inner lining of the colon called the mucosa. Usually there is a change in the genes, and the cells grow abnormally. They can start as an abnormal growth called a polyp and progress to turn into cancer. These cancers are actually slightly more common in men as opposed to women, but the number of cancer is almost the same regardless of gender.

Related Questions

Should women be concerned about colon and rectal cancer?  

Yes. Colorectal cancer occurs in both men and women. Screening tests are appropriate for both. Read more...
Yes. In the United States about 70, 000 women and 70, 000 men were diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2010. (seer data) survival for colon cancer found in the early stage is greater than 90% curable. It is so important for both men and women to get colon/rectal cancer screening. Read more...
Yes. Women can not escape from inflicting yourself on colon and rectal cancer only because you are being a woman. Read more...
Yes. The only difference between men and women here is what is ahead of it in incidence. Breast cancer throws the most commonly occurring cancers off by 1 in women but even if you are unfortunate enough to have breast or lung cancer, you can still get colon or rectal cancer. Read more...
Yes. Women over 50, those with a family history of colon-rectal cancer, those with inflamatory bowel disease (crohns, ulcerative colitis), and a history of colon polyps have a higher than avetage risk and need to be screened more aggressively. Read more...
Yes. Colon cancer affects both sexes and all ages. The youngest one i saw is 25 years old, without any family hisotry. Read more...

When should you be concerned about colon and rectal cancer?

Age 50. The incidence of colorectal cancer goes up after age 50 which is why routine colonoscopy is recommended to begin at that age. The exception would be if you have a strong family history of colon cancer. In that circumstance your physician might decide to begin screening at an earlier age. Read more...
Symptoms and age. Bleeding constipation diarrhea pain or age greater than 50. Any on this list. Read more...

Why should I be concerned about colon and rectal cancer if no family history?

Yes. Though family history increases your personal rik, the vast majority of colorectal cancers are found in patients with no known family history. Read more...
Lethal if not. Caught early. 80% of colon cancers occur in individuals with no family history. If you are over 50 you need a colon examination, preferably a colonoscopy. Read more...

Are colonoscopy, endoscopy, and anoscopy all good ways to tell if I had colon or rectal cancer?

No. endoscopy is a general term that means putting a camera in the body, colonoscopy is endoscopy of the colon and is the gold standard for screening for colon cancer. Anoscopy is an in office procedure to look at the rectum only, usually used to evaluate hemorrhoids, anal fissures and anal/rectal masses and pain. During a colonoscopy a good GI doc will evaluate the anus and rectum as well. Read more...
Full colon. a colonoscopy would be the best way to look at the entire colon for evidence of colon or rectal cancer. Anoscopy just looks at the end and endoscopy is usually the stomach and upper intestines. Read more...