5 doctors weighed in:

If I have hpv, does that mean i'm going to get cancer? I've been diagnosed with HPV and am terrified that I am going to get cancer. What are my odds? .

5 doctors weighed in
3 doctors agree

In brief: No

The majority of people with HPV don't develop cancer.
With routine pap tests and HPV screening, patients rarely go on to develop cancer due to the effectiveness of treatment. In addition, there are many strains of HPV and only a few cause most of the cancers. I recommend you speak with your OB/GYN about your specific results and follow their screening and treatment recommendations.

In brief: No

The majority of people with HPV don't develop cancer.
With routine pap tests and HPV screening, patients rarely go on to develop cancer due to the effectiveness of treatment. In addition, there are many strains of HPV and only a few cause most of the cancers. I recommend you speak with your OB/GYN about your specific results and follow their screening and treatment recommendations.
Dr. Riley Alexander
Dr. Riley Alexander
Thank
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics

In brief: No

Percentages are low.
While some of these strains of HPV have been linked to cancer, you can live a long and productive life and never develop it. As many as 70% of women are antibody positive in some studies. Knowing you are positive gives you more motivation to follow though with cancer screening in the years ahead. Caught early, any changes can be treated & cured.

In brief: No

Percentages are low.
While some of these strains of HPV have been linked to cancer, you can live a long and productive life and never develop it. As many as 70% of women are antibody positive in some studies. Knowing you are positive gives you more motivation to follow though with cancer screening in the years ahead. Caught early, any changes can be treated & cured.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology

In brief: Just comply

Hpv is very common, including the risky strains.
Get immunized so you do not meet other strains, and get your routine Pap smears as directed for your hpv history. This will drop your risk for dying of cancer to near zero.

In brief: Just comply

Hpv is very common, including the risky strains.
Get immunized so you do not meet other strains, and get your routine Pap smears as directed for your hpv history. This will drop your risk for dying of cancer to near zero.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Thank
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry

In brief: Hello,

Hello, I do not know what your odds are of getting cervical cancer.
However, if a female has a human papillomavirus (hpv) infection that remains after age 30, there is an increased risk for cervical cancer. About 30 out of over 100 different strains of hpv can cause cancer. These are classified as high- risk hpv. Women can develop cancer of the cervix, vagina, vulva and anus and men can get cancers affected both the penis and the anus. Between 2003-to 2007 in the United States there was an incidence rate of 10.6 per 1000, 000 cancers that were potentially associated with hpv.

In brief: Hello,

Hello, I do not know what your odds are of getting cervical cancer.
However, if a female has a human papillomavirus (hpv) infection that remains after age 30, there is an increased risk for cervical cancer. About 30 out of over 100 different strains of hpv can cause cancer. These are classified as high- risk hpv. Women can develop cancer of the cervix, vagina, vulva and anus and men can get cancers affected both the penis and the anus. Between 2003-to 2007 in the United States there was an incidence rate of 10.6 per 1000, 000 cancers that were potentially associated with hpv.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Thank
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