Would getting a lung transplant let someone with cystic fibrosis play sports?

Yes. Lung transplantation is a very important treatment option for people with cystic fibrosis that is severely limiting their physical ability. If successful, and it usually is, lung transplantation can offer a person with cystic fibrosis a renewed chance to regain the ability and energy to do many activities that others without this condition take for granted, including some sports.
CF Transplantation. A lung transplantation of both the right and left lung is performed to improve life expectancy of the CF patient. If the transplanted lungs are functioning well, you should be able to participate in non contact sports. Your transplantation division will follow up with you closely to monitor lung function and your overall health.

Related Questions

Does a successful lung transplant completely get rid of the lung problems for cystic fibrosis patients?

Yes. A successful double lung transplant gets rid of pulmonary problems for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, all of the other CF issues persist (chronic sinusitis, pancreatic insufficiency, fertility issues, diabetes). The average five year survival for patients who have CF who undergo transplant is around 55-65%. Read more...
It may. Or you could trade one set of problems for another - even successful lung transplants eventually develop obliterative bronchiolitis after a period of time. Be sure that you meet some post transplant patients who are successful, and compare your quality of life to theirs - if your treatment regimen is oppressive and your lung function is bad enough, you may be better of after a transplant. Read more...
CF. A successful lung transplantation will treat CF lung disease, but not other aspects of the disease, such as sinus disease. A patient will still have cf, but typically will not have to continue their usual CF medications for the treatment of lung disease/ the sinusitis associated with CF can predispose the patient to possible infections with pseudomonas. The first year rate of success is around 90%. Read more...
Unfortunately, no. some cases of cystic fibrosis are much more serious and others – some affect the liver as well as lungs. The cystic fibrosis association warns that transplantation may add years but it is not a cure. Read more...

If I have cystic fibrosis and get a lung transplant, will the disease eventually invade my new lungs?

No. The risk to the transplanted lungs are infection from bacteria left over from the old lungs, and acute and chronic rejection of the new lung by the body. Cystic fibrosis is a defect that is limited to the old lungs. Read more...
It can. Lung transplant for CF is an important life prolonging therapy but it exchanges one set of problems for another. After transplant, there is risk of rejection of the transplanted lungs by one's own immune system requiring use of strong meds that suppress your immune system which then increases your risk of serious infections. There are many facets to this - talk to your CF dr to discuss pros/cons. Read more...
Trachea still CF. The graft of new lungs does leave a trachea that still has the CF defect. This can serve as a source of infection to the new lungs. The new transplanted lungs though will not have CF disease. Read more...

How long would someone with cystic fibrosis be expected to live after a double lung transplant?

Averages. At one year 90 percent of CF patients are alive after lung transplant; the number falls to around 60% at 5 years and 10-15% at 10 years. Double lung transplant patients tend to do better than single lung transplant recipients (probably because they have more reserve if they develop rejection). Read more...
New Drugs . With the development of new immunosuppressive drugs and regimens to manage rejection, doctors are hopeful that life expectancy may improve. The ishlt.Org has some information that may be helpful to you as well. Read more...

Will a lung transplant help with cystic fibrosis?

Yes. A lung transplant will help with the pulmonary problems of cf, but not with the other systemic problems of cf. Lung tx can increase the longevity and quality of life, but at the expense of many medications and visits to the doctor. As the lungs get damage from cf, one may need a lung transplant. Your doctors will be able to guide you on the timing for a lung transplant. Read more...

Is lung transplant really worthwhile for cystic fibrosis? I've heard that less than 1% benefit from the procedure?

Yes it is. Lung transplant for end-stage CF lung disease is worthwhile, the results and survival rates are encouraging, but please ask experts in CF accredited centers who can better inform you about patient selection criteria, wish you wellness. Read more...

Where is the best cystic fibrosis lung transplant hospital in the us?

There are many. Cystic fibrosis is a common cause of end stage lung disease requiring transplant. All of the larger lung transplant programs treat these type of patients. Find out the location of the lung transplant centers in your region. You can contact the american society of transplant surgeons for center locations. Read more...
Lung Transplantation. There are many lung transplantation centers in the U.S. Among the busiest centers, texas children/s hospital performs many lung transplantations per year. The international society for heart and lung transplantation provides statistical information at ishlt.Org. It is also important to consider that you will have many follow up visits, so living close to a center may be important as well. Read more...

Is it true that when you have a lung transplant for cystic fibrosis you have to have a heart transplant as well?

No. Patients with cystic fibrosis often will have a double lung transplant. Heart transplant is only required if pulmonary hypertension is so severe in cystic fibrosis that it has affected the function of the heart. Thus, CF patients do not require heart transplant when they have lung transplant (the great majority of the time). Read more...
No. A heart-lung transplant is needed only on patients with significant pulmonary hypertension, usually in cases of congenital heart disease. This is not the case in cystic fibrosis, where lung transplantation alone is enough. Read more...
No. A simultaneous heart and lung transplant is needed for a small number of patients, usually with severe pulmonary hypertension. . In the us there were about 1600 lung transplants done per year, and about 30 combined heart-lung transplants. Read more...