5 doctors weighed in:

Why do patients often develop tracheomalacia after cardiac surgery?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Savas Mavridis
Surgery - Thoracic
3 doctors agree

In brief: Very rare

Patients do not often develop tracheomalacia after heart surgery.
It is very rare for that to happen. When it does occur it is related to prolonged need for a ventilator and a breathing tube that is inverted prior to surgery. Usualy that tube is removed immediately after surgery of 4-6 hours later. If it is needed for more than 10-14 days then a tracheostomy is done to prevent such problems.

In brief: Very rare

Patients do not often develop tracheomalacia after heart surgery.
It is very rare for that to happen. When it does occur it is related to prolonged need for a ventilator and a breathing tube that is inverted prior to surgery. Usualy that tube is removed immediately after surgery of 4-6 hours later. If it is needed for more than 10-14 days then a tracheostomy is done to prevent such problems.
Dr. Savas Mavridis
Dr. Savas Mavridis
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Dr. Donald Thomas
Surgery - Thoracic

In brief: Rare

Patients do not commonly develop tracheomalacia after cardiac surgery.
This is extremely rare. I have heard of it and may have seen it once in my career. It is related to endotracheal tube cuff pressure and duration of intubation.

In brief: Rare

Patients do not commonly develop tracheomalacia after cardiac surgery.
This is extremely rare. I have heard of it and may have seen it once in my career. It is related to endotracheal tube cuff pressure and duration of intubation.
Dr. Donald Thomas
Dr. Donald Thomas
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Dr. Jonathan Popler
Pediatrics - Pulmonology

In brief: Vessel compression

Depending on the type of cardiac lesions, there may be enlarged arteries or veins that compress the airways.
Occasionally, this can affect the trachea or windpipe. This can cause tracheomalacia or floppiness of the airways.

In brief: Vessel compression

Depending on the type of cardiac lesions, there may be enlarged arteries or veins that compress the airways.
Occasionally, this can affect the trachea or windpipe. This can cause tracheomalacia or floppiness of the airways.
Dr. Jonathan Popler
Dr. Jonathan Popler
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1 comment
Dr. Steven Guyton
This occurs more often in patients with congenital cardiac disease rather than in adults.
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