What is the rate of recurrence after successful lung cancer surgery?

Too high. For comfort! rates apply to groups. Even 1 node positive drops the cure rate below 50-60%. The finer you select for smaller lesions and squamous histology, the rate may be as high as 80%. We have worked to select the best treatment and better treatment ffor years, but the ace of progress is slow. This is why we urge never starting to smoke, and stopping now if you do.
Depends on stage. Recurrence rates are dependent on the stage of lung cancer that a patient is having surgery for. Stage i lung cancer has low recurrence rates, stage ii less than iii and iii the highest. Most recurrences happen in the first 3 years after surgery. Therefore a patient should be in a radiographic surveillance program after surgery. A tumor found after 5 years is probably a brand new lung cancer.

Related Questions

What can I do to control my pain after lung cancer surgery?

Many things. We have many medicines and approaches to managing pain. The best approach for you will depend on the type of pain you have and its severity. There is no "one size fits all" approach to pain management. You need to discuss the type of pain and severity of it with your physician. Read more...
Be active. The most important thing you can do is to be as active as you can! use the little breathing exercise tool (voldyne) they gave as often as you can, take your pain medicine as prescribed and be active. You should feel much better after a couple weeks and fully recovered after 4-6 weeks. If you are still having pain beyond that, you need to see your doctor to determine if there is something wrong! Read more...

Help please? How long will a person have lung pain after lung cancer surgery?

Not at all. Pain is due to incisions, not the lung, which really has no feeling. In some patients, some degree of incisional pain can persist for months. Read more...

Is it a bad idea for me to put off my lung cancer surgery for 6 weeks?

Depends on the stage. Earlier lung cancers that don't require concurrent chemotherap and/or radiotherapy, 6 weeks is ok. Though you would not want to wait 3 months or more. More advanced stages of lung cancer that require chemotherapy and/or radiation, often it is a good idea to move along with therapy. Read more...
Does it make... The difference between cure and failure to wait 6 weeks? Probably no. Cn the confined to cancer spread to nodes or somewhere else, perhaps. Fear of the procedure, surviving it, and desire to do something fun can fuel this idea. Is it yours, your partner's, your kids, friends? Lung cancer is not a gentle or considerate monster. Have a great reason for delay or get it over. Read more...

Does lung cancer surgery stimulate the remaining cancer cells to grow faster?

No. The purpose of th surgery is to remove all the cancer. The myth that "the air causes it to grow" is false. The truth is cancer cells grow very well with or without surgery if they are hiding in nodes or far off places. This the proof that additional chemotherapy works in more advanced stage, and perhaps of some help in stage ii (+hilar nodes). Read more...
No. Unfortunately, there is a mistaken belief that surgery actually causes lung cancer to grow. This "old wives tale" has scared patients from getting early treatment. Please, if you are lucky enough to have your lung cancer discovered early and are a surgical candidate then have your surgery. Surgery will not cause your lung cancer to grow faster. Read more...

Why would someone who has had lung cancer surgery need a liver biopsy?

Check for metastasis. Cancer spreads to other organs. If you have a mass in your liver, it needs to checked for metastatic lung cancer or a new tumor. Read more...
Tumor spread. Cancers can spread to different areas in the body. It is not uncommon for lung cancer to spread beyond the lung to other areas such as the liver and bone. If you have a known lung cancer and an abnormality in the liver it may be spread of the lung cancer. Certain tests like an MRI may be helpful to see if it is an often seen benign lesion (hemangioma). If it can't you may need a biopsy. Read more...

What is best treatment option for lung cancer...Surgery, targeted drugs or cehmo/radiation and why?

Staging. Treatment of lung cancer depends on the staging. Oncologist will decide what kind of treatment is necessary. Read more...
Sometimes only one. Sometimes all 3, but lung cancer is really several diseases depending upon the stage, and the type of cancer. The treatment tool box differs for each stage. So one of the most important pieces of information is accurately knowing the stage. A common error is misuse of the pet scan (a very useful test in general) as a substitute for biopsy, as opposed to a road MAP to knowing what to biopsy. Read more...
Personalized therapy. Will require more than 400 words to explain. Tx for lung ca is personalized, -individualized . To formulate plan - will need to know the type of lung cancer, the stage , the mollecular profiles /biology of the cancer cells, other prognostic factors , and other factors including age, overall medical condition, preferences etc. No one glove fits all. Please discuss with your oncologist. Read more...
Depends. Most important question is type (histology) of lung cancer: non-small cell vs small cell. Small cell is usually widespread and not amenable to surgery. Most common lung cancer is non-small cell. This almost always requires surgery for cure. Radiation, chemotherapy and/or biologic (targeted) treatments may be used in addition to surgery or by themselves if surgery is not possible, or if metastatic. Read more...
Depends on stage. In the medically fit individually, the standard of care upfront therapy for stage i -iib nsclc is surgery. For stage iiia either chemotherapy +/- radiation followed by surgery or chemoradiation alone. For stage iiia - iv, therapy is chemotherapy +/- radiation. Any of the chemotherapy options may be "targeted" as part of a clinical trial. For more info: http://bit.Ly/ygfoko. Read more...
Multidisciplinary. Standard of care for stage i -iib nsclc is surgery. For stage iiia either chemotherapy +/- radiation followed by surgery or chemoradiation alone. Treatment is best by multidisciplinary and individualized with a targeted approach. The patient's overall health/fitness, tumor type, and molecular/genetic specifics should be considered to formulate best approach. Read more...

Is it normal for me to be coughing a lot at bedtime a month after my lung cancer surgery?

Yes. It is not unusual for postoperative patients to have a cough as they open up air sacs that tend to collapse under anesthesia. However, if the cough continues, speak to your physician. Read more...
Normal is. A setting on the clothes washer. Your surgery removed a branch, blood supply, bronchus and lung tissue. The bronchus and vessels need to be sealed tight. The lung needs to re-expand to fill the space left vacant. A cough helps to do this. But it depends on whether the space is filling with good things or bad. No fever, no chills, no difficlty breathing, probably ok. But check with your surgeon. Read more...
To a degree. But if it persists, then one should see their surgeon and let them know that the coughing persists. Read more...

Is it unusual for elderly patients to completely lose their appetite after lung cancer surgery?

No. Surgery may temporarily cause anorexia as the body uses all resources to heal. This may cut appetite. The key is to fine foods that the patient really likes. In extreme cases your doctor can prescribe medication to boost appetite. Adequate nutrition is key for complete healing after surgery. Read more...
Appetite/Lung Ca. Particularly squamous lung cancer is an appetite thief. Many show up with major weight loss, a sign that points to worse outcome. It is not the treatment, but radiotherapy and chemotherapy can briefly cause diffiuclt swallowing. Successful treatment sometimes brings appetite back. Megace (megestrol) can stimulate appetite for some, but not all. Read more...

Why might my kidneys have failed during my lung cancer surgery?

Many factors. There are several factors that can lead to kidney failure, especially after a surgical procedure. This may be due to the anesthesia, the surgery itself, or from metabolic changes that occur both during and after the surgery. Optimizing your overall medical condition will help facilitate your recovery. Read more...
Kidney failure. After any operation is unfortunate and could be from many causes: an antibiotic, low blood pressure, high blood pressure, underlying kidney disease, a blood clot, etc. It's not usual, but it does not mean something was done improperly. Ask your doctor. If your not satisfied with the answer, have your records reviewed to establish the cause to your satisfaction. Read more...