How do I pick a surgeon for Asian eyelid surgery? Should I focus only on surgeons who specialize in Asian eyelid surgery? Or is it similar enough to regular blepharoplasty that I can use someone who specializes in that but not necessarily Asian eyes? .

The . The surgeon who has enough training to perform asian blepharoplasty( eyelid surgery) and also has performed good numbers of that surgery with good post op results. ( always ask to see the pre and post operative pictures!).
Asian blepharoplasty. Have your eyelids evaluated by a board certified surgeon with expertise in these procedures. Having a lot of experience in Asian blepharoplasty is a plus.
You . You should first focus on a surgeon who specializes in eyelid surgery (an oculoplastic surgeon). Look at the american society of ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgeons (asoprs) website at www.Asoprs.Org to find one near you. There are not that many who "specialize" in asian lid surgery but if you find one, interview him before you sign up for surgery.
You . You should pick your doctor the way you would pick any other doctor. Verify credentials and hospital affiliations. Get referrals from other trusted medical professionals. Meet with at least 2 or 3 and discuss your concerns and expectations.

Related Questions

Can I choose how high a crease to get with Asian eyelid surgery? I've read about different crease heights with Asian eyelid surgery. Is this something I can choose, or does the surgeon choose depending on my eye/eyelid size? .

This . This will be a decision you will make with your plastic surgeon. Some of this will depend on your own anatomy of your eyelid and brow position. You need to consult with a plastic surgeon in your area. Best of luck to you. www.natureredefined.com. Read more...
Some . Some asians want to keep their low (1-3 mm) lid crease and some want to raise the crease to a more "westernized" height of 10-12mm. Discuss at length with your surgeon. Once raised, it is not easy to lower it back. www.asoprs.org. Read more...
Asian blepharoplasty. You can discuss your surgical goals with your surgeon. It is possible for patients to voice their opinions on the height of their crease. Have your eyelids evaluated by a board certified surgeon with expertise in these procedures. Read more...

Can Asian eyelid surgery help me if I do have a crease, but my eyes are hooded? From what I've read, I think my problem is too much fat in my eyelids? Does Asian eyelid surgery help with that, or do I need regular blepharoplasty? .

Asian . Asian eyelids look asian because of where the levator muscle inserts on the tarsal plate and skin (typically low) giving a very low lid crease just above the lashes. In caucasian lids, the crease is much higher (10-12 mm). Both types of lids have fat (especially in the inner corner). If you are asian, you want to discuss at length with you surgeon whether or not you want to keep the asian low crease or have more of a caucasian high crease. The surgery for both are very similar with little (important) nuances. Find your eyelid expert at www.Asoprs.Org. Read more...
Based . Based on your description, i think that you would need a standard blepharoplasty. I would recommend getting an appointment with a lid surgeon to know for sure. Read more...
From . From your description, it sounds as you will essentially be undergoing the typical "caucasian" eyelid surgery unless you are having an epicanthal fold repaired. Read more...
Asian blepharoplasty. From the description of your features, you may require aging Asian blepharoplasty with browpexy. Have your eyelids evaluated by a board certified surgeon with expertise in these procedures. Read more...

What should I ask surgeons about Asian eyelid surgery during interviews? I'm going to start talking to surgeons to find one to do my Asian eyelid surgery. I want to choose the best one, but I'm not sure what to ask to make a good choice. And what should t

Ask . Ask if you are a good candidate, how is it done, what are the potential risks & complication and how many of these surgeries has the doctor done. Dr. Edwards. Read more...
Explain what u want. Make sure you explain to the surgeon what you are looking for. "asian eyelid surgery" entails many things. Removing the fold of skin (epicanthal fold) above the corner of your eye is sometimes done, sometimes not. Creating a "double eyelid" entails creating a nonexistent crease on the eyelid to resemble a "western" eyelid. Make sure the surgeon understands want you want to look like! Read more...
Asian blepharoplasty. A good start would be: where did you receive your education? What board certification(s) do you hold? How many asian blepharoplasties did you perform this past year? May i see before/after pictures. May i speak to patients of yours? Which technique do you recommend? (suture, partial, incisional) what kind of fold do you recommend? (infold, on, outfold). What can i expect from surgery? Read more...
Asian blepharoplasty. Training and experience are very important factors for a skilled surgeon. Have your eyelids evaluated by a board certified surgeon with expertise in these procedures. Read more...

How can I make an Asian eyelid surgery heal fast? Are there any ointments I can use or other steps I can take to keep recovery as short as possible? The surgeons I've talked to said complete recovery can be as long as six weeks! I'd like to shorten that.

Full . Full recovery actually takes longer, but that does not necessarily mean you will look like you are still recovering for months. Recovery length depends on a combination of surgical technique, your body's healing and a little luck. There are several treatments that can be done before, during and after surgery to speed your outward recovery, but these need to be done in conjunction with your chosen surgeon. Too many surgeons can spoil your results. Read more...
The . The short answer is "no, there is not much you can do". Actually i think your surgeon is being slightly optimistic with his estimate. Because of the additional manipulation required for this procedure to create the eyelid fold, i would estimate approximately 2 months of healing time to see a 90% reduction in swelling. Some things you can do that will help: 1. Follow your doctors instructions for application of ice or cold compresses to the letter. Also sleep with your head at least 30 degrees above horizontal for 3 weeks 2. Use arnica montana and bromelain (or eat pineapple) to reduce swelling and bruising. Both can be obtained from your health food store. 3. Ask your physician about avoiding absorbable sutures, if possible, which create more inflammation. Overall, i would consider 6 - 8 weeks a worthwhile investment in time and plan for it. Read more...
The . The question about recovery is hard to answer. Most of your recovery that you see will be the first two weeks, but there is still more recovery. The full maturing of the scar takes about one year. The surgical site will take about three months to completely soften. After six weeks you pretty much don't notice any more changes and the scar has good strength. So i would say your surgeon has given you a pretty good answer. Best wishes dr. Peterson. Read more...
Asian blepharoplasty. Follow your surgeon's pre and postop instructions to optimize your healing. Otherwise, it is tincture of time. Read more...

Does Asian eyelid surgery make the eyes actually bigger, or do they simply appear bigger because there's a fold?

Appear bigger. When asian eyelid surgery is performed the opening between the upper and lower eyelids is made bigger and the fold on the upper lid is further defined. The eye itself remains the same size. Read more...
Appear bigger. Blepharoplasty does not change the size of the eyes. The folds can make the eyes seem bigger. Read more...
Depends. Asian eyelid surgery can be performed strictly to create a fold without changing the size of the opening or can be combined with a levator muscle adjustment, therefor increasing the opening of the eye and changing a narrow opening to an almond shape eye. Read more...
Not really. This operation does not increase the size of the palpebral aperature but it may give the optical illusion of a more open or alert. Eye. Read more...
Asian blepharoplasty. After Asian blepharoplasty, the eyes appear larger because the presence of the crease creates a more open eyed look. Read more...

How bad is scarring after Asian eyelid surgery? I know the scars are supposed to be hidden in the crease when your eyes are open, but what about when you blink? Is it really noticeable? I don't want it to be obvious I've had Asian eyelid surgery.

The . The skin of the eyelid is the thinnest skin of the body and does not scar significantly. After 6-9 months, the scar is typically imperceptible. Read more...
Typically . Typically the upper eyelid scar is well concealed in the upper eyelid crease and tend to form a barely visible fine line. Read more...
Asian blepharoplasty. When designed and executed well, the scars will be thin and hidden in the supratarsal crease. For the first few months of healing, it may be a little red and darker than the surrounding skin but with proper wound care will soften and even out. Read more...
Asian blepharoplasty. it takes a full year for a scar to s heal. At first the scars may be reddish and even a bit lumpy to the touch. At the end of the end of the healing process, the scar should be a fine line matching your skin. This scar will be hidden in your blink. It will be obvious to the trained eye but should blend in well for most patients. as you are healing, you can wear make up. Read more...

How common is assymetrical creases after Asian eyelid surgery? I'm thinking of having Asian eyelid surgery, but I'm worried about my eyes looking mismatched. It happened to a friend. Her doctor told her it could take 6 months for results to be final, but

In . In the hands of an experienced eyelid surgeon, i find this to be a relatively rare complication. Asymmetry can usually be avoided. Find a local eyelid specialist in your area at www.Asoprs.Org. Read more...
Assymetrical . Assymetrical creases are not at all uncommon with asian eyelid surgery. You should consult with a few plastic surgeons with experience with the procedure. It can happen to any patient or any surgeon and therefore it is important to have a good discussion before surgery regarding handling that issue should it arise. Sometimes a revision surgery is indicated. Fortunately, a minor degree of asymmetry is well tolerated as eyelids, similar to many of our other facial features are rarely completely symmetric with or without surgery. Read more...
Asymmetry . Asymmetry occurs more often in nature than symmetry. So, the answer to your question is: very common. However, the degree of asymmetry may vary and if signficant could warrant revisionary surgery. Read more...
Not commom. You should be evaluated and treated by an oculofacial plastics surgeon (its a sub-specialty within ophthalmology). These doctors have a lot more experience dealing with eyelids than the general ophthalmologist. If done correctly there shouldn't be any assymetry. Read more...
Asian blepharoplasty. Asymmetries are a possibility after Asian blepharoplasty especially if the underlying cause was not diagnosed preoperatively. Have your eyelids evaluated by a board certified surgeon with expertise in these procedures. Read more...