4 doctors weighed in:
Is there a known genetic basis for lung cancer?
4 doctors weighed in

Dr. Douglas Arenberg
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care
2 doctors agree
In brief: Genetic risk...
...For lung cancer is a hot topic of research and there is a large national consortium studying families with multiple relatives having lung cancer to identigy genes that transmit risk.
No one gene has been, or is likely to be, found, but multiple candidate "culprit" genes are under investigation. One barrier is finding families willing to participate. Look this up on cancer.Gov.

In brief: Genetic risk...
...For lung cancer is a hot topic of research and there is a large national consortium studying families with multiple relatives having lung cancer to identigy genes that transmit risk.
No one gene has been, or is likely to be, found, but multiple candidate "culprit" genes are under investigation. One barrier is finding families willing to participate. Look this up on cancer.Gov.
Dr. Douglas Arenberg
Dr. Douglas Arenberg
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Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology
In brief: Not sure the "lung
Cancer" gene has been found, and the carcinogens causing the clinical phenomenon damage dna in multiple ways so that be the time the cancer develops, there are multiple mutations.
Detecting specific mutations has lead to "breakthrough" new drugs, oddly mostly in non-smokers and only a small proportion of smoking patients. Probing the genetic and molecular basis is a hot pursuit in labs worldwide.

In brief: Not sure the "lung
Cancer" gene has been found, and the carcinogens causing the clinical phenomenon damage dna in multiple ways so that be the time the cancer develops, there are multiple mutations.
Detecting specific mutations has lead to "breakthrough" new drugs, oddly mostly in non-smokers and only a small proportion of smoking patients. Probing the genetic and molecular basis is a hot pursuit in labs worldwide.
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Thank
Dr. David Cooke
Surgery - Thoracic
In brief: Yes
Although over 80% of lung cancer in the United States is caused by exposure to cigarette smoke (both first hand and second hand), some lung cancers are the result to certain mutations.
For instance, mutations to the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) can predispose some people to lung cancer.

In brief: Yes
Although over 80% of lung cancer in the United States is caused by exposure to cigarette smoke (both first hand and second hand), some lung cancers are the result to certain mutations.
For instance, mutations to the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) can predispose some people to lung cancer.
Dr. David Cooke
Dr. David Cooke
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