Is surgery the best treatment for esophageal cancer?

Maybe. Therapy for esophageal cancer is dependent on the stage. There are IV relative stages. In the physically fit patient, the upfront therapy for stage i and iia is surgery. For stages iib and iii, the therapy of choice is chemoradiation followed by surgery. For stage iv, chemotherapy +/- radiation and no surgery. In the patient in poor physical condition, chemoradiotherapy without surgery.
Yes. If the cancer is localized, then the best therapy is resection. It allows your surgeon to make sure all of the cancer has been removed, as well as doing a complete mediastinal lymph node dissection, which may determine the need for post- operative chemotherapy or radiation.

Related Questions

Is surgery required as part of therapy of my localized esophageal cancer?

Most of the time. Surgery is a standard option for localized esophageal cancer. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are used before surgery to improve the odds of completely removing all cancer. Otherwise, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are given after surgery to reduce the odds of cancer returning. If the cancer involves structures within the chest (blood vessels, windpipe, heart lining, etc.) surgery can not be done. Read more...
Usually. In the medically fit individual surgery is the standard of care for early stage esophageal cancer. Read more...
Surgeons. Wisely select who might benefit from surgery. In the eus era, all t1-t2 lesions are able to undergo surgery if they are medically fit to do so. Those that penetrate throught the muscle are in need of chemo and raiotherapy, +/- surgery. The natural history of the disease tells you what to do if you are wise enough to listen. Read more...
No.. Humans do not grow back organs that are removed. Some cells and tissues regenerate (skin, blood elements, GI tract lining) but not organs or limbs. Read more...
A 1- 1.2 cm. S'clav node is not very large or even easy to feel. Your question included "immunodeficiency", that can be code for hiv. Hiv commonly has ubiquitous nodes of this size in many locations. Knowing viral load and cd-4 counts become important in this situation, and review of meds. Read more...
Actually, night sweats are . Not specific to lymphoma, so do not be so sure. There is no "lymphoma prevention" regimen. See your doctor, get an exam, h/she will order test. Relax. Read more...
I'd be very. Enthusiastic about genetic tests if all of you had the same cancer, i.e. Familial adenomatous polyposis. If one had a sarcoma another a brain tumor, the li fraumeni syndrome might be operational...The problem is that genetic testing can be expensive, and you need to ponder what the information will do for you, your family and your children. Read more...
If you were. "constipated", hou still may have some fecal blockade. The straining can indeed cause hemorrhoids to act up. It may be best to go to the doctor and be checked than sequential: miralax/mag citrate/fleets, and then a regimen to avoid constipation: fresh fruits, dried fruits--apricots are as powerful as prunes. Read more...
Some T cell malignancy. Is curable, others less so. Mycosis fungoides/sezary syndrome, aka cutaneous t-cell lymphoma is very treatable, but unlikely to be cured. Others in nodes are not too different than b-cells. Unfortuantely there is not a rituximab, anti -cd-20 b-cell antibody equivalent for t-cells. Read more...
Anti-oxidants. And there are plenty, are dietary and nutritional supplements that purport to reduce cancer risk. These reduce free radicals, chemicals with an unpaired electron, or repair the damage that an oxidizing millieu produces. Vitamin e has thought to be in this group, and sulfhyryl molecules that sponge up free radicals. But than water solubles like elagic acids from berries and vitamin c too. Not oxygenation. Read more...
In that it always. Effects genes, either mutation or dysregulation, yes. But it may not always be genetic meaning heritable. Not all cancers are due to our genetic endowment (li fraumeni, brca -1&2, retinoblastoma gene), some by our foolish activity (smoking), others we just don't know. Read more...
Often recommended. For best survival in fit patients, surgery for stage i and iia. In stages iib and iii, standard approach is chemoradiation followed by surgery. More advanced, i.e. Stage iv, chemotherapy +/- radiation and no surgery. Best results will be with a comprehensive multidisciplinary thoracic surgical oncology team. http://goo.gl/6phtu. Read more...

What's the best treatment to get rid of esophageal cancer?

Surgery. Surgery for early esophageal cancer can be curative...Modern surgical oncologists have better results in terms of less complications and some patients may need additional radiation or chemothearpy. For advanced cancers the treatment is chemotherapy +/- radiation. Read more...
Depend on the stage. The treatment for esophageal cancer will depend on many factors. The most improtant ones are the stage of the disease and performance status of the patient / and other comorbidities. There are 3 treatment modalities to treat cancer- surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Whether the patient needs to get surgery or combination chemo and radiation and followed by surgery -depend on the above factor. Read more...
Depends on the stage. For stage i through iia, the standard of care for the medically fit patient is surgery or esophagectomy. For stage iia to iii, first chemotherapy +/- radiation followed by surgery. For stage iv, chemotherapy +/- radiation. There are many different surgical approaches. For more info try fightec.Org and cancer.Gov. Read more...
Stage. Complete staging and comprehensive approach are critical. Stages i through iia, in appropriate surgical candidates, surgery (esophagectomy) is first line. For stage iia to iii, first chemotherapy +/- radiation followed by surgery. For stage iv, chemotherapy +/- radiation. In appropriate candidates, surgery +/- additional treatments demonstrates the best longterm survival. Read more...

Is surgery the only effective treatment for esophageal cancer?

No. Therapy for esophageal cancer is dependent on the stage. There are IV relative stages. In the physically fit patient, the upfront therapy for stage i and iia is surgery. For stages iib and iii, the therapy of choice is chemoradiation followed by surgery. For stage iv, chemotherapy +/- radiation and no surgery. In the patient in poor physical condition, chemoradiotherapy without surgery. Read more...
No. There are multiple therapies available for esophageal carcinoma, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, laser, photo-dynamic therapy, and other. For curative intent, with appropriately selected patients, surgery is still the best chance for cure. Read more...

What is the treatment for esophageal cancer?

Depends on stage. There are 4 stages of esophageal cancer (with a and b subtypes for some). For stage i and iia, the upfront therapy is surgery or esophagectomy. For stage iib or iii, treatment is chemoradiation followed by surgery, or definitive chemoradiation. For stage iv, the treatment is chemotherapy, + /- radiation. Read more...
Resection. Resectional therapy in early stages with or without adjuvant chemotherapy with w/o radiation. Chance to resect chance to cure. Staging determines chance for cure. Most cases poor outcomes due to delayed diagnosis stage iii and IV when discovered. Read more...
Don't smoke. Esophageal cancer can also be called barrett's disease. This may be graded i-iv. Early barrett's can be managed with acid-reduction meds and by avoiding nicotine, alcohol, and other direct irritants. It is possible that by avoiding everything that has contributed to your (early?) cancer, that it may be held at bay. Be sure to follow regularly with your GI doc! Read more...

How often will I need to have endoscopies after my esophageal cancer surgery?

Maybe 0. Patients who undergo surgery for esophageal cancer are generally enrolled in a surveillance program. This may entail chest ct scans every 4 months for 2 years, than every 6 months for 1 year, then once a year. Suspicious things on ct scan can be followed up with a pet scan. Routine surveillance endoscopy is not necessary, unless used for addressing symptoms. Read more...
Depends. For most surgical resections, follow-up esophagoscopy is selective. For laser procedures, mucosal resections, photo dynamic therapy, or chemo/ radiation therapy, esophagoscopy surveillance is mandatory for life. Read more...

Could having surgery for esophageal cancer make me lose my memory?

Sort of. Its not uncommon to have changes in short term memory, concentration and some cognitive function after major surgery. The stress of surgery diverts the body's nutrients towards healing (catabolic state or "fight or flight") as opposed to higher brain function. This is usually self limiting, and will get better the further out you are from surgery. Read more...
Very unlikely. It is very unlikely for that to happen. There are some situations like stroke or low perfusion presure to the brain that may occur, as well as medications that may have contributed to what you are experiencing. You should see you doctor right away, to do a full work up to identify the cause, and treat or prevent further problems. Read more...

What should be expected after treatment of esophageal cancer?

After surgery. After an esophagectomy, or removal of the esophagus for cancer, your ability to eat large meals will be diminished. You will need to eat 6 small meals a day intead of 3 large meals. You might lose your appetitie, so it is important to do scheduled eating to maintain your weight. Also you will need to avoid certain foods. http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/surgery/specialties/cardio/esophagus.html. Read more...
Ca Esophagus. Ca esophagus surgery is very involved. Usually there are life style changes after surgery. The rate of complications is very high. Read more...

Can I have another surgery if my esophageal cancer has come back and spread?

NO. Surgery is used as primary treatment only. Recurrent cancer is treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Read more...
It depends. It depends where it has recurred. Re-operative surgery for esopahgeal cancer is very complex with a lot of risk. It is not common, so if it is to be considered, it should be at a quaternary center with experience. Read more...