8 doctors weighed in:

What is the average length for a crown on a molar hi, i go to a prosthedontist for all of the dental work except his hygenists. I have my teeth cleaned by another office that i think is more thorough and has the latest equipment. He is expensive, but i

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kevin Owoc
Dentistry - Prosthodontics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Depends

Crowns can last a very long time.
The average lifespan is around 10 years. However, if the fit of the crown is excellent, and you brush and floss very well around it, as well as have regular hygiene visits, it's quite possible it may last longer. If not, the crown can fail at any point due to cavities or neglect. Keep smiling !

In brief: Depends

Crowns can last a very long time.
The average lifespan is around 10 years. However, if the fit of the crown is excellent, and you brush and floss very well around it, as well as have regular hygiene visits, it's quite possible it may last longer. If not, the crown can fail at any point due to cavities or neglect. Keep smiling !
Dr. Kevin Owoc
Dr. Kevin Owoc
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Dr. Robert Tupac
Dentistry - Prosthodontics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Long time

Crowns usually last 10 to 15 years--in terms of wear and tear--but new decay of periodontal problems of the same tooth (separate from the crown) can occur.

In brief: Long time

Crowns usually last 10 to 15 years--in terms of wear and tear--but new decay of periodontal problems of the same tooth (separate from the crown) can occur.
Dr. Robert Tupac
Dr. Robert Tupac
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Dr. Felicia Mata
Dentistry - Cosmetic

In brief: Was

Was the percentage of bone left mentioned by your prosthodontist? I had a case where implant wasn't elected and the patient wanted to hold on the tooth till it is hopeless, regardless of the fee for the procedures.
A root canal retreatment was done on a second molar that had a failing root canal, 45% bone loss on the right side (mesial) and 55% on the left side (distal) with bifurcation (where the root splits from the trunk of the tooth) still intact; root resorption was also evident. After 5 years, the condition of the second molar that had root canal and crown presented better bone density and much healthier! the secret? I made the patient swore that he would not go to sleep until he brushed, flossed, and rinsed antiseptic with flouride. A remarkable oral hygiene and regular dental visit did it. This takes a lot of discipline including diet. Some people are genetically more susceptible to lose bone than others. There is so much more to say and the approach may not be the same based on the factors affecting a condition in every case... Dentists have very high overhead and if a treatment fails, it wouldn't change the expense and time spent in performing a procedure. Why not ask for a discount especially if everything will be paid upfront ?

In brief: Was

Was the percentage of bone left mentioned by your prosthodontist? I had a case where implant wasn't elected and the patient wanted to hold on the tooth till it is hopeless, regardless of the fee for the procedures.
A root canal retreatment was done on a second molar that had a failing root canal, 45% bone loss on the right side (mesial) and 55% on the left side (distal) with bifurcation (where the root splits from the trunk of the tooth) still intact; root resorption was also evident. After 5 years, the condition of the second molar that had root canal and crown presented better bone density and much healthier! the secret? I made the patient swore that he would not go to sleep until he brushed, flossed, and rinsed antiseptic with flouride. A remarkable oral hygiene and regular dental visit did it. This takes a lot of discipline including diet. Some people are genetically more susceptible to lose bone than others. There is so much more to say and the approach may not be the same based on the factors affecting a condition in every case... Dentists have very high overhead and if a treatment fails, it wouldn't change the expense and time spent in performing a procedure. Why not ask for a discount especially if everything will be paid upfront ?
Dr. Felicia Mata
Dr. Felicia Mata
Thank

In brief: By

By what you have described, a crown was placed by your dentist approximately three and one half years ago.
At the time the crown was placed, i'm confident your dentist felt that this tooth had sufficient bone support and considered it healthy enough to restore. It probably needed a crown since it was sufficiently broken down above the gum line. Following the placement of this crown, the nerve inside this tooth went bad (most likely from the decay this tooth had, the old large filling, etc) which necessitated the need for the root canal treatment to save the tooth. From what you described, this has been a difficult procedure that had to be retreated numerous times. This does occur from time to time. If this did happen, there may have been bone loss around the tooth from the multiple infections. This bone loss occured after the crown was placed, from an apparent infection. This not directly connected to the crown your dentist placed. On average, dental restorations do last ten years and greater, but in this case the restoration is fine. It is the support structure (your tooth and bone) that is failing. This does not appear to be your dentist's fault. If you have lost as much bone as you describe, it may be better to discuss extraction and bone grafting to preserve your bone ridge to allow for implant placement before additional bone loss occurs. Too much bone loss may prevent implant placement in the future. Discuss all of your concerns with your dentist so that you can be given your options and in this way you can make an informed decision as to how to proceed.

In brief: By

By what you have described, a crown was placed by your dentist approximately three and one half years ago.
At the time the crown was placed, i'm confident your dentist felt that this tooth had sufficient bone support and considered it healthy enough to restore. It probably needed a crown since it was sufficiently broken down above the gum line. Following the placement of this crown, the nerve inside this tooth went bad (most likely from the decay this tooth had, the old large filling, etc) which necessitated the need for the root canal treatment to save the tooth. From what you described, this has been a difficult procedure that had to be retreated numerous times. This does occur from time to time. If this did happen, there may have been bone loss around the tooth from the multiple infections. This bone loss occured after the crown was placed, from an apparent infection. This not directly connected to the crown your dentist placed. On average, dental restorations do last ten years and greater, but in this case the restoration is fine. It is the support structure (your tooth and bone) that is failing. This does not appear to be your dentist's fault. If you have lost as much bone as you describe, it may be better to discuss extraction and bone grafting to preserve your bone ridge to allow for implant placement before additional bone loss occurs. Too much bone loss may prevent implant placement in the future. Discuss all of your concerns with your dentist so that you can be given your options and in this way you can make an informed decision as to how to proceed.
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
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In brief: A

A crown should last longer than 31/2 years.
You have the right to ask for a discount but it is up to your dentist to honor and make good on his work. Hopefully your situation will work out fairly.

In brief: A

A crown should last longer than 31/2 years.
You have the right to ask for a discount but it is up to your dentist to honor and make good on his work. Hopefully your situation will work out fairly.
Dr. Mitchel Blumenthal
Dr. Mitchel Blumenthal
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Dr. Neil McLeod
Dentistry - Prosthodontics

In brief: Well made and properly maintained a crown can last for years

Let's take a look at your question which, putting the peripherals about the cleanings aside, is how long should a dental crown last and why do I need root canal therapy on a tooth which has been crowned? My own teeth were restored in1976.
I still have gold onlays in my mouth thirty six years later. Good dentistry can last a long time in a well maintained mouth where the restorations have been designed to work in a properly balanced set of healthy teeth with good boney support. Now back to your question. How long should my crowns last? My answer is that all depends. You might recall a conversation with your prosthodontist discussing that there are a lot of things which need to be corrected, but we may be able to make this tooth last for a while, but unfortunately it has poor boney support and may fail soon or in a few years. We can restore your appearance and function if we repair it now. The thing we try to accomplish is to explain the scenario to our patients so that they do not have unreasonable expectations for how long our work will last when it is being placed in a compromised situation. When teeth are traumatized in the bite, or if the gums surrounding the teeth have been difficult to clean or neglected, then bone loss occurs. This can reach a point where the remaining bone is unable to withstand the pressure of the bite. We now replace such a tooth with a bone graft and dental implants. It is always a disappointment to a patient and a dentist if a tooth is found to need root canal treatment after it has been crowned. It is hard not to feel like a failure because we all know it means the cart was put before the horse. Everyone knows that if a tooth needs root canal therapy it should be done before the crown, and only after a proper post has been made to reinforce the tooth correctly. When a dentist prepares a tooth for a crown, he removes all the damaged and decayed tooth structure and having previously checked that the tooth is vital (that means has a healthy living nerve inside the pulp) he makes a clinical assessment as to the likelihood of success with the restoration you and he are choosing together. We never place a crown knowing or thinking that root treatment will be necessary after seating it. That is an unfortunate sequel to treatment that may not always be anticipated. It seems that you have found yourself in this situation. So when a doctor and you agree to repair your damaged tooth together you make an informed decision to accept the treatment suggestion and hope it will be successful and last a long time. That is not always what happens. So do you have the right to ask for a discount on the replacement crown? Well! yes and no! the fact that you can see that additional fees are required after root canal treatment is performed show that you are understanding that considerable cost and effort needs to go into fixing that tooth. Re-evaluating the whole situation is a good thing at this stage. You might be better off not doing the root treatment and putting the funds towards an implant. On the other hand if the root treatment has already been performed through the crown, it might be possible to close to space with a filling and observe the tooth for a while not spending any more on it. But if the tooth is worth saving, and if it is going to need a post and a crown, then i think you might have success asking you prosthodontist if he is prepared to give you a break on the fees. That way you will both feel better about resolving the matter. The last thing you want to do is alienate a fine clinician who you already know does beautiful work for you. Dr. Neil mcleod dentistry that lasts - quality that counts.

In brief: Well made and properly maintained a crown can last for years

Let's take a look at your question which, putting the peripherals about the cleanings aside, is how long should a dental crown last and why do I need root canal therapy on a tooth which has been crowned? My own teeth were restored in1976.
I still have gold onlays in my mouth thirty six years later. Good dentistry can last a long time in a well maintained mouth where the restorations have been designed to work in a properly balanced set of healthy teeth with good boney support. Now back to your question. How long should my crowns last? My answer is that all depends. You might recall a conversation with your prosthodontist discussing that there are a lot of things which need to be corrected, but we may be able to make this tooth last for a while, but unfortunately it has poor boney support and may fail soon or in a few years. We can restore your appearance and function if we repair it now. The thing we try to accomplish is to explain the scenario to our patients so that they do not have unreasonable expectations for how long our work will last when it is being placed in a compromised situation. When teeth are traumatized in the bite, or if the gums surrounding the teeth have been difficult to clean or neglected, then bone loss occurs. This can reach a point where the remaining bone is unable to withstand the pressure of the bite. We now replace such a tooth with a bone graft and dental implants. It is always a disappointment to a patient and a dentist if a tooth is found to need root canal treatment after it has been crowned. It is hard not to feel like a failure because we all know it means the cart was put before the horse. Everyone knows that if a tooth needs root canal therapy it should be done before the crown, and only after a proper post has been made to reinforce the tooth correctly. When a dentist prepares a tooth for a crown, he removes all the damaged and decayed tooth structure and having previously checked that the tooth is vital (that means has a healthy living nerve inside the pulp) he makes a clinical assessment as to the likelihood of success with the restoration you and he are choosing together. We never place a crown knowing or thinking that root treatment will be necessary after seating it. That is an unfortunate sequel to treatment that may not always be anticipated. It seems that you have found yourself in this situation. So when a doctor and you agree to repair your damaged tooth together you make an informed decision to accept the treatment suggestion and hope it will be successful and last a long time. That is not always what happens. So do you have the right to ask for a discount on the replacement crown? Well! yes and no! the fact that you can see that additional fees are required after root canal treatment is performed show that you are understanding that considerable cost and effort needs to go into fixing that tooth. Re-evaluating the whole situation is a good thing at this stage. You might be better off not doing the root treatment and putting the funds towards an implant. On the other hand if the root treatment has already been performed through the crown, it might be possible to close to space with a filling and observe the tooth for a while not spending any more on it. But if the tooth is worth saving, and if it is going to need a post and a crown, then i think you might have success asking you prosthodontist if he is prepared to give you a break on the fees. That way you will both feel better about resolving the matter. The last thing you want to do is alienate a fine clinician who you already know does beautiful work for you. Dr. Neil mcleod dentistry that lasts - quality that counts.
Dr. Neil McLeod
Dr. Neil McLeod
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