4 doctors weighed in:

How do I prevent my dad getting mono? I went to 2 different doctors who had said for sure that i didn't have mono, but i demanded a blood test. Meanwhile, i did share a drink with my dad, after all they said i didn't have it. Today i found out that I do h

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Cheryl Winchell
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Over

Over 95% of people have had mono by the time they reach age 30.
So there is only a 5% chance or less that your dad will contract the disease from you. Don't you wish you could get those odds in vegas?

In brief: Over

Over 95% of people have had mono by the time they reach age 30.
So there is only a 5% chance or less that your dad will contract the disease from you. Don't you wish you could get those odds in vegas?
Dr. Cheryl Winchell
Dr. Cheryl Winchell
Thank
Dr. Stephen Christensen
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: I'm

I'm sorry you're ill.
As you've discovered, mono can elude diagnosis in its early stages, as it can mimic other illnesses (viral infections, strep throat, etc.). It takes 10 to 14 days for your immune system to produce antibodies to the virus that causes mono, so ordering the blood test when you first get sick is of little value. Now, most adults already have antibodies to ebv -- the mono virus -- so they're immune to reinfection. However, an occasional adult does fall ill with mono, and they're treated just like younger people who catch this disease. Sharing utensils and water glasses is one way to spread mono, and this practice should be avoided, just as it should be whether you feel ill or not (a wide array of infections -- not just mono -- can be spread by sharing water glasses, bottles, spoons, etc.). Once you're exposed to mono, if you're not already immune there's little you can do to prevent the infection from occurring. Without a blood test there's no way to determine if your father is immune to mono. At this point, just practice good hygiene: wash your hands frequently, cough or sneeze into your hand, sleeve, or handkerchief, and don't share personal items with other people. I hope you feel better soon!

In brief: I'm

I'm sorry you're ill.
As you've discovered, mono can elude diagnosis in its early stages, as it can mimic other illnesses (viral infections, strep throat, etc.). It takes 10 to 14 days for your immune system to produce antibodies to the virus that causes mono, so ordering the blood test when you first get sick is of little value. Now, most adults already have antibodies to ebv -- the mono virus -- so they're immune to reinfection. However, an occasional adult does fall ill with mono, and they're treated just like younger people who catch this disease. Sharing utensils and water glasses is one way to spread mono, and this practice should be avoided, just as it should be whether you feel ill or not (a wide array of infections -- not just mono -- can be spread by sharing water glasses, bottles, spoons, etc.). Once you're exposed to mono, if you're not already immune there's little you can do to prevent the infection from occurring. Without a blood test there's no way to determine if your father is immune to mono. At this point, just practice good hygiene: wash your hands frequently, cough or sneeze into your hand, sleeve, or handkerchief, and don't share personal items with other people. I hope you feel better soon!
Dr. Stephen Christensen
Dr. Stephen Christensen
Thank
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