2 doctors weighed in:

Should i seek a physical exam regarding my lower back pain? Yesterday i woke up with lower back pain (mostly on the right side of my back, but it feels like the pain is coming from mostly the spine area). I do a lot of careful strength training. I am used

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brian Le
Pain Management

In brief: Back pain

The back pain can be caused by muscle strain, spinal stenosis, ruptured disc, nerve impingement .
.. You might benefit from heat pads, exercise, massage. If your pain is not improved, you should seek help from a pain management doctor. You might benefit from a comprehensive evaluation and treatment.

In brief: Back pain

The back pain can be caused by muscle strain, spinal stenosis, ruptured disc, nerve impingement .
.. You might benefit from heat pads, exercise, massage. If your pain is not improved, you should seek help from a pain management doctor. You might benefit from a comprehensive evaluation and treatment.
Dr. Brian Le
Dr. Brian Le
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Dr. Monica Wood
Surgery - Hand Surgery

In brief: This

This is a difficult question: on the one hand, back pain occurs in 80% of people in their lifetime.
Most back pain is not structural and does not cause long-term problems. Studies have been done to determine who needs x-rays and mri's and who doesn't. Imaging studies are frequently overused in what is called "defensive medicine"--an attempt to ward off lawsuits for missed diagnoses. On the other hand, the spine is quite complex and certain conditions can be serious. Back pain with a foot drop (weakness pulling up the toes) or loss of bowel and bladder function can mean a serious nerve injury. Other conditions, such as kidney stones, can cause back pain as well. What we do know is that there is likelihood of MRI abnormalities, even without symptoms, that is proportionate to age. That is: about 30% of 30-year-olds will have some disk abnormality, 40% of 40-year-olds, etc. Just because there is an abnormality does not mean it is causing your symptoms. Over-imaging leads to surgeries which leads to complications. This is a situation where there can be definite harm in over-treating. It sounds like you are having spasms that arch your back. They can be quite painful and difficult to break. The safest answer, of course, is the "defensive" answer--go to a physician. However, be mindful of the possibility of being over-treated and seriously consider a second (or third) opinion. Unless there are concerning findings, such as weakness or a mass, do not rush into any treatment plan.

In brief: This

This is a difficult question: on the one hand, back pain occurs in 80% of people in their lifetime.
Most back pain is not structural and does not cause long-term problems. Studies have been done to determine who needs x-rays and mri's and who doesn't. Imaging studies are frequently overused in what is called "defensive medicine"--an attempt to ward off lawsuits for missed diagnoses. On the other hand, the spine is quite complex and certain conditions can be serious. Back pain with a foot drop (weakness pulling up the toes) or loss of bowel and bladder function can mean a serious nerve injury. Other conditions, such as kidney stones, can cause back pain as well. What we do know is that there is likelihood of MRI abnormalities, even without symptoms, that is proportionate to age. That is: about 30% of 30-year-olds will have some disk abnormality, 40% of 40-year-olds, etc. Just because there is an abnormality does not mean it is causing your symptoms. Over-imaging leads to surgeries which leads to complications. This is a situation where there can be definite harm in over-treating. It sounds like you are having spasms that arch your back. They can be quite painful and difficult to break. The safest answer, of course, is the "defensive" answer--go to a physician. However, be mindful of the possibility of being over-treated and seriously consider a second (or third) opinion. Unless there are concerning findings, such as weakness or a mass, do not rush into any treatment plan.
Dr. Monica Wood
Dr. Monica Wood
Thank
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