4 doctors weighed in:

How can I get rid of molluscum on my daughter's face and around her eyes? The doctor has treated other areas of her body with cantharone, but will not use it on her face or near her eyes.

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeffrey Fromowitz
Dermatology

In brief: Time

You may wish to wait it out, as it will usually resolve with time.
Alternatively you may discuss with your dermatologist Imiquimod and tretinoin cream as a treatment option, or simply curretage.

In brief: Time

You may wish to wait it out, as it will usually resolve with time.
Alternatively you may discuss with your dermatologist Imiquimod and tretinoin cream as a treatment option, or simply curretage.
Dr. Jeffrey Fromowitz
Dr. Jeffrey Fromowitz
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Dr. James Seward
Dermatology

In brief: I

I agree. Curetting can work or a very minute amount of cantharidin in a very cooperative patient.
Read more about molluscum treatment at the link below. I hope that helps.

In brief: I

I agree. Curetting can work or a very minute amount of cantharidin in a very cooperative patient.
Read more about molluscum treatment at the link below. I hope that helps.
Dr. James Seward
Dr. James Seward
Thank
Dr. Todd Mcniff
Internal Medicine

In brief: Molluscum

Molluscum will go away on its own in in children with normal immune systems.
Not treating the disease is a perfectly reasonable and well-accepted option. A major reason to treat the lesions would be if the child was prone to picking at the lesions possibly resulting in scarring or infection. If that's not the case, waiting until the lesions go away is a very reasonable, inexpensive, less-traumatic course to go. If there is a true reason for treatment, curetage (excising the core of the lesion) or cryotherapy (freezing the lesions with liquid nitrogen) are both good options. In children of color, though, cryotherapy can sometimes result in hypopigmentation (lighter skin) in the treated areas.

In brief: Molluscum

Molluscum will go away on its own in in children with normal immune systems.
Not treating the disease is a perfectly reasonable and well-accepted option. A major reason to treat the lesions would be if the child was prone to picking at the lesions possibly resulting in scarring or infection. If that's not the case, waiting until the lesions go away is a very reasonable, inexpensive, less-traumatic course to go. If there is a true reason for treatment, curetage (excising the core of the lesion) or cryotherapy (freezing the lesions with liquid nitrogen) are both good options. In children of color, though, cryotherapy can sometimes result in hypopigmentation (lighter skin) in the treated areas.
Dr. Todd Mcniff
Dr. Todd Mcniff
Thank
Dr. William Goldstein
Ophthalmology

In brief: Manual

Manual removal with a curette by a dermatologist is the best way.

In brief: Manual

Manual removal with a curette by a dermatologist is the best way.
Dr. William Goldstein
Dr. William Goldstein
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