What is a radiation oncology physicist?

Team member. They are a scientist with a specialty in radiation physics who work with the radiation oncologist to plan the various radiation fields and doses required for treatment. This aids in reducing exposure of normal tissues to radiation and maximizes the dose to cancer tissues. They are an integral part of the health care team. It is a highly sought after position.
Medical physicist. They are professionals who train in medical physics and learn about all the technical aspect of radiation. From the design of the treatment machines to assisting doctors in creating plans on how to effectively treat patients. They also provide the safety of all aspects of the machines and radioactive substances. They are a major part of the radiation team.
Medical Physicit. All radiation theory facilities have a physicist usually with with a masters degree or phd. He or she callibrates the machines and monitors the department to make sure patients are getting what the radiation oncologist prescribed. The physicist also often helps the oncologist determine the best way to give the radiation. They can get board certified and have done 1-2 yrs of special training.
Physicist. Its a physicist who is responsible for the safety and delivery of radiation therapy in a radiation oncology department by being involved in the planning of the radiation treatments, the qa of the plans and the safety checks of the machines.

Related Questions

What is the difference between nuclear medicine and radiation oncology?

NM-diagnosis. Nuclear medicine uses small amounts of radioactive materials to do imaging (mostly), (and sometimes treat patients). Radiation oncology usually uses external beam radiation to treat patients (usually cancer patients). Radiation oncology is not used for diagnosis. Read more...
Radiation Oncology . Radiation oncology is a field of medicine that is for treatment of cancer and rarely benign disease with x-rays generated from a machine or by prescribing radio pharmaceuticals (radioactive drugs). Nuclear medicine is a field of medicine that uses radioactive compounds to diagnose disease. This field of medicine can be used in cancer, heart disease, rheumatology, and even bleeding. Read more...
Not exactly. Nuclear medicine uses isotopes mainly for functional diagnoses of disorders of gall bladder, heart, brain, lungs, thyroid,bones, kidneys and bladder. Nuclear medicine has a few therapeutic uses including thyroid ablation and therapy for prostate bone metastases. Radiotherapy can involve radiation therapy with xray and proton beams, not considered part of nuclear medicine. Read more...

Will walking through the radiation oncology department expose me to dangerous levels of radiation?

No. There is plenty of shielding to protect you and the healthcare workers. There are rules, and regulations to monitor these levels in common areas. Read more...
No. The rooms where the radiation accelerator is located is shielded and have thick concrete walls. The hallways and rooms where people walk or work will have no radiation exposure. Read more...
No. Areas with possible exposure should be clearly marked according to well established safety regulations. The staff at any radiation oncology department will be able to guide you in terms of areas where one is not allowed. But generally most areas within a department are quite safe. Read more...
Absolutely not. The radiation department is one of the most shielded and therefore well protected aces in the entire hospital for patients as well as other degrees f safety checks and protective guidelines. Read more...

What is done in the specialty radiation oncology?

Cancer treatment. In radiation oncology we use ionizing radiation to treat cancer or benign tumors with curative or palliative intent. Sometimes, we use radiation to treat non-cancerous conditions. Read more...
Radiotherapy. They are part of a multidisciplinary cancer treatment team that are experts in the indications, effects, and complications of radiation treatment. They develop planning and timing of treatments. And follow patietns clinically for effect and complications. They also can effectively palliate symptoms in patients with incurable malignancy. Read more...
Oncologist . We are oncologists (cancer doctors) that specialize in treating cancer patients using radiation. Read more...
To be honest. I humbly feel we are the cancer specialists offering the widest breadth of cancer care. No other oncology specialist takes care of cancers from head to toe, children $ benign tumors. We perform exams like ENT scopes, pelvic exams & must be aware of chemo & surgery options for each site & stage of disease. We perform procedures placing applicators into organs /cancer to deliver brachytherapy. Read more...

What's the difference between normal and radiation oncology?

An oncologist. Studies, and treats tumors and cancers. A radiation oncologist focuses on the use of radiotherapy, medical: chemotherapy, surgical: surgery, gyncologic: women's cancer, pediatric: children etc. Get it? Read more...
Training, treatment. Medical or "normal" oncologists use chemotherapy to treat cancer. Radiation oncologists are specially trained to understand and use different types of radiation to treat cancer as well as some non malignant diseases. The training pathways are very different although different types oncologists work hand in hand. Read more...

Is there a good radiation oncology center near most areas of the country?

Yes. These days smaller communities have cancer and radiation centers. However perhaps not every latest or complex capability is offered. Most patients therefore will do fine at these center but should do their due diligence and make sure what they are receiving is the standard of care. Read more...
Maybe. Unfortunately, the more rural areas tend not to have centers and with the proposed cuts in reimbursement, many are probably not financially sustainable in the future. However, the major cities around the country have good centers. Read more...

Will visiting the radiation oncology department expose me to some amount of radiation?

No. Not unless you are a patient being treated or someone who works in the department handling radioactive sources. Read more...
No! There is lots of shielding around all the machines, so there is no risk to casual visitors. Read more...
Likely Not. There is background radiation in the environment. If you stay out of the required well labeled restricted areas, it is unlikely you will be exposed to any or at least any relevant amount of radiation. Read more...
No. Radiation oncology centers are very well shielded. In fact, the amount of radiation exposure is less than walking around outside or flying in a plane. Read more...

What's to be expected? Might visiting the radiation oncology department expose me to radiation?

It depends where. Just visiting the department will likely not cause much radiation exposure. However, if you are going into a room for treatment your exposure possibly be higher, depending on the treatment device and other surrounding circumstances in the particular environment. Read more...
Not likely. Visiting the department is unlikely to give you any significant exposure compared to visiting any other department. It is unlikely that you would be exposed to any radiation at significant levels unless you were there for treatment. Read more...
No. There is no "stray" radiation in a radiation treatment facility. It is perfectly safe to visit. The radiation is only in when the patient is in the from and the door is closed which blocks exposure to people who don't need the radiation. Read more...