Is there a way to insert something into my breast where the cancer was removed and do radiation therapy from the inside?

Yes. This is a new technique called "accelerated partial breast irradiation", apbi. A hollow device is placed where the cancer was removed. Radioactivity is put in the device twice a day for five days. Trials show this equals whole breast radiation for small tumors with negative nodes in women over 60 who don't need chemotherapy. More studies are underway. Go to www. Astro. Org for updated guidelines.
Yes. Mammosite, contura and others are names of the catheters that are inserted in the lumpectomy site that allow radiation to temporarily be inserted and give radiation from the inside out. You have to be the right age and stage to qualify.
Mammosite and its. Current copies. The lump needs to be deep enough, and the lesion needs to be small enough and excised. The m product used one channel, there are newer balloons that are multi channeled. This is not for everyone, but check it out with someone that does it.

Related Questions

Can breast cancer recur after radiation therapy?

Yes. After a lumpectomy and whole breast radiation, there is a 12-15% chance that breast cancer will come back in the same breast within 5 years. However, the chance of recurrence is much higher without radiation therapy.
Yes. However, chance of recurrence is much reduced because of radiation. This is the reason that radiation is the standard of care after breast conservation surgery. Chance of local recurrence is reduced by about 2/3.
Yes. No matter what treatment, cancer of the breast does not have 100 % results. So with lumpectomy and radiation cancer can still recurr. This is why patients need to follow with all their doctors for exams and x-rays. If there is a recurrence other options exist such as mastectomy.

Do I need radiation therapy if I have early stage breast cancer with clear margins?

Probably. Discuss at length with your doc. If you are really 32, you have a much higher risk of recurrence in the breast than a much older woman (assuming that you had lumpectomy). Radiation or mastectomy is definitely indicated. Lumpectomy alone may be ok in very selected post-menopausal tumors that are estrogen receptor positive, good margins, small, and with specific pathologic features.
Depends on surgery. The answer to this depends mainly on the type of surgery you have had. If you had a mastectomy, you would not require radiation. If you had a lumpectomy, you probably would benefit from radiation.
Maybe. The stage is important, but so are other things. Namely, the type of carcinoma (ductal vs lobular), invasive disease vs in situ (or both), differentiation status, receptor expression, etc. If low grade, neg margins & neg nodes, skipping radiation is likely an option. If your oncologist insists, ask why, and get yourself a second opinion (including pathology review) for assurance.
Yes! There is nothing that makes a surgeon more uncomfortable after a lumpectomy than hearing the question: "did you get it all? " cancer is very humbling and it's growth is not completely predictable. While our margins may be "clear", we know many women will return with cancer at this lumpectomy site within 2-3 years unless radiation therapy is given. With rare exception, radiation rx is necessary.

Is radiation therapy necessary when I have early stage of breast cancer with all clear margins?

Adjuvant radiation. For early stage of breast cancer-when a breast sparing surgery-i.e. Lumpectomy is able to be done with clear margins- postsurgical radiation therapy is recommended to reduce risk for local recurrence to the affected breast. So, the asnwer is yes, it is necessary.
Radiation, don't know. I do agree with dr. Ho, with the exception of triple negative breast cancertnbc is neg for estrogen, progesterone, her2 receptors because of this there is not a direct chemo treatment. Also this type of breast ca -about 15% of breast cancers-is usually not very sensitive to radiation therapy it is quite responsive to chemotherapy (non-hormonal). If you are "autoimmune" rads may not work well.
Yes! There is nothing that makes a surgeon more uncomfortable after a lumpectomy than hearing the question: "did you get it all? " cancer is very humbling and it's growth is not completely predictable. While our margins may be "clear", we know many women will return with cancer at this lumpectomy site within 2-3 years unless radiation therapy is given. With rare exception, radiation rx is necessary.