20 doctors weighed in:

How does underbite lead to tooth decay? Our son has a mild underbite that i wasn't worried about, until i read that it can lead to greater tooth decay. How does that happen? .

20 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gary Brigham
Dentistry - Orthodontics
4 doctors agree

In brief: No connection

An underbite refers to a malposition of jaws and/ or anterior tooth positions.
Although severe tooth crowding can lead to decay when these teeth are not properly cleaned on a routine basis, there is no relationship between underbite of any kind and tooth decay.

In brief: No connection

An underbite refers to a malposition of jaws and/ or anterior tooth positions.
Although severe tooth crowding can lead to decay when these teeth are not properly cleaned on a routine basis, there is no relationship between underbite of any kind and tooth decay.
Dr. Gary Brigham
Dr. Gary Brigham
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2 comments
Dr. Reena Gupta
tooth decay is related to oral hygiene and food habbits.even with underbite tooth decay can be prevented with routine dental check ups and good hygiene
Dr. Anthony D'Amico
Almost right. Underbite can cause severe tooth abrasion and breakdown of the inside of the upper teeth and lip side of the lower teeth. Get the braces to open the bite!
Dr. Zackary Faber
Dentistry - Cosmetic
2 doctors agree

In brief: Not really

An underbite is something that should be addressed as early as possible.
This because it is a growth issue. Tooth decay (cavities) are not a primary concern, but it is more the wearing away of the front teeth (grinding of front teeth). This causes the teeth to be shorter and more sensitive. Your son should see an orthodontist to determine the correct plan so that his teeth can be protected.

In brief: Not really

An underbite is something that should be addressed as early as possible.
This because it is a growth issue. Tooth decay (cavities) are not a primary concern, but it is more the wearing away of the front teeth (grinding of front teeth). This causes the teeth to be shorter and more sensitive. Your son should see an orthodontist to determine the correct plan so that his teeth can be protected.
Dr. Zackary Faber
Dr. Zackary Faber
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Dr. Deborah Sappington
Dentistry - Orthodontics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Inability to brush

The underbite itself does not lead to tooth decay, as decay is a function of whether the teeth are properly cleaned.
You may have heard that the misalignment of the teeth can cause decay, and this is true. Teeth that are very crowded are harder to keep clean, and harder to pass floss between.

In brief: Inability to brush

The underbite itself does not lead to tooth decay, as decay is a function of whether the teeth are properly cleaned.
You may have heard that the misalignment of the teeth can cause decay, and this is true. Teeth that are very crowded are harder to keep clean, and harder to pass floss between.
Dr. Deborah Sappington
Dr. Deborah Sappington
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Dr. David Schleimer
Dentistry - Orthodontics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Unrelated

Nothing in the literature nor my 30 years of practice leads me to believe these are in any way connected.

In brief: Unrelated

Nothing in the literature nor my 30 years of practice leads me to believe these are in any way connected.
Dr. David Schleimer
Dr. David Schleimer
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Dr. Robert Stoner
Dentistry - Orthodontics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: It doesn't

The evidence based literature does not find a correlation between underbite and decay.

In brief: It doesn't

The evidence based literature does not find a correlation between underbite and decay.
Dr. Robert Stoner
Dr. Robert Stoner
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Dr. Arnold Malerman
Dentistry - Orthodontics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: New one on me

As an orthodontist i've been treating patients with underbites for over 40 years.
Any malocclusion (including underbite) can make it harder to brush & floss. Additionally, when teeth malpositioned food does not pass over them normally when eating. Malocclusion makes oral hygiene more difficult, and therefore higher cavity risk. But underbite itself no worst than other malocclusions as to decay.

In brief: New one on me

As an orthodontist i've been treating patients with underbites for over 40 years.
Any malocclusion (including underbite) can make it harder to brush & floss. Additionally, when teeth malpositioned food does not pass over them normally when eating. Malocclusion makes oral hygiene more difficult, and therefore higher cavity risk. But underbite itself no worst than other malocclusions as to decay.
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Dr. Arnold Malerman
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Dr. Theron Baker
Dentistry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: I'm

I'm curious where you read this information.
Underbite (the bottom teeth projecting out farther than the upper teeth) does not directly impact risk for tooth decay - unless the position of his teeth compromises his ability to clean his teeth. There are many other oral health reasons for your son to address his underbite issue. I would recommend that you have him evaluated by an orthodontist to see if his particular underbite is one that will need correction. Often sooner is better with orthodontics.

In brief: I'm

I'm curious where you read this information.
Underbite (the bottom teeth projecting out farther than the upper teeth) does not directly impact risk for tooth decay - unless the position of his teeth compromises his ability to clean his teeth. There are many other oral health reasons for your son to address his underbite issue. I would recommend that you have him evaluated by an orthodontist to see if his particular underbite is one that will need correction. Often sooner is better with orthodontics.
Dr. Theron Baker
Dr. Theron Baker
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Dr. Hans Reinemer
Dentistry - Pediatric

In brief: Not necessarily

Underbite itself is not a direct cause of tooth decay.
However, an underbite may also be associated with crowding of the teeth. When there is crowding, it may be more difficult to thoroughly brush and floss. Obtain an orthodontic consult to address the underbite. Also increase your hygiene efforts, especially in crowded areas, to decrease the decay risk.

In brief: Not necessarily

Underbite itself is not a direct cause of tooth decay.
However, an underbite may also be associated with crowding of the teeth. When there is crowding, it may be more difficult to thoroughly brush and floss. Obtain an orthodontic consult to address the underbite. Also increase your hygiene efforts, especially in crowded areas, to decrease the decay risk.
Dr. Hans Reinemer
Dr. Hans Reinemer
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