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Yesterday i had a shock sensation in my head that lasted 1-3 seconds. No medical issues. What was it? Under lots of stress with family issues . 4 bipolar people depend on me. I have been rn x 39 years . I have never taken anxiety agents or antidepress

4 doctors weighed in
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In brief: Wow!

Wow! as a nurse with 39 years of professional experience you intellectual know how very stressful care for very ill patients can be.
How you have held it together for so long is quite remarkable. Stress has to be expressed somehow. What isn't felt out gets acted out, either behaviorally or physically. There is great wisdom in the adage that the difference between a pressure cooker and a kettle is the whistle! you need and deserve to have emotional and physical support and relief. You ultimately are going to be of no value to those many others who depend upon you is you just break down. The physical symptom you describe may have been the healthy warning signal saying what you seem to have difficulty saying directly: "help!" listen to it and find a support group. We know from caretakers of patients with alzheimers that their viability as caretakers depends upon getting some care taking of themselves. The professional literature has many reports of studies showing how urgent this need is. Real strength is not just "sucking it up" and carrying on, but acknowledging that you are real, human, have needs, and despite all of your efforts to the contrary are not an invincible wonder woman (although from what you describe, you come as close as in needed to such a description). Of course, you realize that, notwithstanding your medical training, you should allow yourself to be a patient and ask your doctor to make sure there isn't more than "bone-crushing" stress involved in your symptom. Then, get the support you need and deserve. Taking such a break is like a long distance runner, if you keep going at breakneck speed, you will not pace yourself for the distance. Then who will possibly fill in for you?!

In brief: Wow!

Wow! as a nurse with 39 years of professional experience you intellectual know how very stressful care for very ill patients can be.
How you have held it together for so long is quite remarkable. Stress has to be expressed somehow. What isn't felt out gets acted out, either behaviorally or physically. There is great wisdom in the adage that the difference between a pressure cooker and a kettle is the whistle! you need and deserve to have emotional and physical support and relief. You ultimately are going to be of no value to those many others who depend upon you is you just break down. The physical symptom you describe may have been the healthy warning signal saying what you seem to have difficulty saying directly: "help!" listen to it and find a support group. We know from caretakers of patients with alzheimers that their viability as caretakers depends upon getting some care taking of themselves. The professional literature has many reports of studies showing how urgent this need is. Real strength is not just "sucking it up" and carrying on, but acknowledging that you are real, human, have needs, and despite all of your efforts to the contrary are not an invincible wonder woman (although from what you describe, you come as close as in needed to such a description). Of course, you realize that, notwithstanding your medical training, you should allow yourself to be a patient and ask your doctor to make sure there isn't more than "bone-crushing" stress involved in your symptom. Then, get the support you need and deserve. Taking such a break is like a long distance runner, if you keep going at breakneck speed, you will not pace yourself for the distance. Then who will possibly fill in for you?!
Dr. Sheldon Kardener
Dr. Sheldon Kardener
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Dr. Reynald Ferraz
Psychiatry

In brief: Just

Just to answer your question, one strong probability, from the timeline relationship of significant stress and appearance of a neurological symptom, is your body's expression of a psychological response to stress.
"the nerves" for that matter (which doesn't really have to involve just the extremities). You may want to take measurements of your vital signs like heart rate and blood pressure since changes in these body systems are often associated with stress.

In brief: Just

Just to answer your question, one strong probability, from the timeline relationship of significant stress and appearance of a neurological symptom, is your body's expression of a psychological response to stress.
"the nerves" for that matter (which doesn't really have to involve just the extremities). You may want to take measurements of your vital signs like heart rate and blood pressure since changes in these body systems are often associated with stress.
Dr. Reynald Ferraz
Dr. Reynald Ferraz
Thank
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry

In brief: Hello,

Hello, this sensation is sometimes referred to as a "brain zap".
I am estimating that you are in your late 50's to your 60's, just by the length of time you have been an rn. One symptom of menopause can be an electric shock sensation in the head. This can be accompanied shortly thereafter by a hot flash. Another cause for this sensation is anxiety.

In brief: Hello,

Hello, this sensation is sometimes referred to as a "brain zap".
I am estimating that you are in your late 50's to your 60's, just by the length of time you have been an rn. One symptom of menopause can be an electric shock sensation in the head. This can be accompanied shortly thereafter by a hot flash. Another cause for this sensation is anxiety.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Thank
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