2 doctors weighed in:

Is my one yr old having night terrors ? My one yr old wakes up screaming when i try to pick him up he will usualy throw himself back down onto the bed and doesn't want me to pick him up when I do finaly pick him up he pushes and kicks screaming louder we

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ricardo Fontillas
Pediatrics - Psychiatry

In brief: Common in children

Most night terrors, children has no recall when they wake up.
Suggest looking at what he eats prior to bedtime. May have allergy to certain foods. Try switching his food and use something different if this helps then avoid that certain food.

In brief: Common in children

Most night terrors, children has no recall when they wake up.
Suggest looking at what he eats prior to bedtime. May have allergy to certain foods. Try switching his food and use something different if this helps then avoid that certain food.
Dr. Ricardo Fontillas
Dr. Ricardo Fontillas
Thank
Dr. Melissa Przeklasa-Auth
Pediatrics - Neurology

In brief: A

A night terror is a type of sleep disorder called a parasomnia that predominantly affects children between the ages of 3 and 12.
They typically occur during the first few hours of sleep during state 3 or 4 non-rem sleep. They should not be confused with nightmares which are bad dreams. Usually the child will “bolt upright” with their eyes wide open and the look of fear or panic on their face. This is usually accompanied by screaming, sweating, rapid heart rate. The child is not awake during these spells, is often confused and inconsolable during the spell and is amnestic to it in the morning. On average they can occur one time per week. More frequent events should warrant evaluation. Your son seems a little young for night terrors. I would have him evaluated by his pediatrician to see if he is suffering from reflux as well.

In brief: A

A night terror is a type of sleep disorder called a parasomnia that predominantly affects children between the ages of 3 and 12.
They typically occur during the first few hours of sleep during state 3 or 4 non-rem sleep. They should not be confused with nightmares which are bad dreams. Usually the child will “bolt upright” with their eyes wide open and the look of fear or panic on their face. This is usually accompanied by screaming, sweating, rapid heart rate. The child is not awake during these spells, is often confused and inconsolable during the spell and is amnestic to it in the morning. On average they can occur one time per week. More frequent events should warrant evaluation. Your son seems a little young for night terrors. I would have him evaluated by his pediatrician to see if he is suffering from reflux as well.
Dr. Melissa Przeklasa-Auth
Dr. Melissa Przeklasa-Auth
Thank
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