Does brachytherapy for prostate cancer have the same side effects as beam radiation?

No. Though both types of radiation are delivered to the prostate the brachytherapy has higher levels of radiation that cause more urinary symptoms than external beam. The external beam radiation has greater side effects on the rectum where as a properly performed brachytherapy procedure should have virtually no rectal symptoms.
Proportionate RIsk. I emphasize risk of urinary effects with brachytherapy, but many if not most have none; i emphasize risk of proctitis even 3-4 years later, in fewer than 10%, but this can happen with either method, but commonly does not happen to most. Some patients getting both, have higher risks. But risk does not mean actually getting a problem, but you need to know to be informed.
Similar. External beam radiation (XRT) has been a treatment for prostate cancer for > 60 years. Brachytherapy or seed implant therapy was devised as a way of trying to reduce the effect of the beam radiation on local tissues such as the bladder and rectum. Both therapies can result in bowel and bladder irritation, though usually not severe. Xrt does have a higher risk for subsequent bladder cancer.
Yes. Brachytherapy is another form of radiation therapy to treat prostate cancer. The only difference is the manner in which the radiation is delivered. Brachytherapy may cause more urinary symptoms since a higher dose of radiation is delivered in a shorter amount of time. However, the side effects are about the same which include urinary frequency, urinating at night, and some mild urinary discomfort.

Related Questions

What is the advantage of internal brachytherapy vs external radiation for prostate cancer? Seems as if everyone would prefer the external route.

Brachytheraphy best. Good question and there will be a many opinions. Well performed brachytheraphy places the radiation dose inside the prostate emitting it's dose outward to just beyond the edge of prostatic tissue. In low gleason score low volume disease this should be as effective as surgical removal. Need to assess voiding ability before the procedure. With ebrt surrounding tissues receive more radiation. Read more...
Convenience. Historically, there used to be greater advantages. There are many fewer advantages today, since external beam radiation has advanced greatly. You can save time by having brachytherapy. The advantages used to be greater. Cyberknife treatment offers all the benefits of both: only five days, and none of the bruising pain and bleeding of seed placement. Good luck with your choice. Read more...

What are the side effects of radiation for prostate cancer?

Here are some... Radiation intends to kill cancers but always accompanying its collateral injury to all the tissues projected through. As a result, nature or features of all injured tissues may ensue leading to less ability to function and self-repair. Hence, urinary and/or fecal frequency, bleeding from rectum or bladder, etc. may develop. At times, feeling some tiredness may also happen to few. Generally, rare. Read more...

Why is testosterone replacement not advisable after brachytherapy for prostate cancer?

Growth Factor. Testosterone stimulates growth and multiplication of prostate cells - both normal and cancerous ones. So if any cells survive the brachytherapy, they will grow faster in the presence of testosterone, and be more likely to form a large mass or spread to other parts of the body before being detected. Read more...
TRT post radiation. Hypogonadism following prostate radiation is a serious issue that affects biological changes and quality of life. The main fear is prostate cancer recurrence as testosterone stimulates the prostate and possibly dormant prostate cancer. Controversy exists regarding management with limited clinical data. Some institutions a advocating trt with caution and close psa f/u. Sarosdy mf et al cancer 2007. Read more...

Can I have hormone replacment after brachytherapy for prostate cancer I get very tired and run down have triuble sleeping am very moody?

No... If you mean replace testosterone, absolutely not a urologist won a nobel prize for proving that removing the testicles, eg: eliminating testosterone, delays progression of prostate cancer since one can never be sure last cancer celkl gone, don't take risk of giving testosterone! Read more...
No. Don't take testosterone. You are receiving therapy for your prostate cancer. The goal for prostate cancer therapy is to decrease your testosterone level. If you take testosterone, it is almost like pouring fuel to the fire- you are just going to feed the cancer cells. Talk to your md and ask for help. Keep active and exercise. Your md also has to rule out other causes of your problem above. Read more...

Does brachytherapy prove effective for any kind of cancer other than prostate cancer?

Breast Cancer. Brachytherapy has been used for breast cancer rx for over 30 years; however, it's only been perfected over the past decade, utilizing special catheters placed into the breast followed by twice-daily treatments for 5 days. While "not for everyone", it is an effective option for some patients with early breast cancer. This is particularly useful if travel to radiation centers is an issue. Read more...
Yes,for limb sarcoma. Brachytherapy following wide local excision for high grade sarcomas of the limbs and abdominal wall has led to increased survival and limb salvage. Read more...
Yes. While brachytherapy is usually used for prostate cancer, it has been used for other tumors. In urology specifically, it has proven effective as a penile saving therapy for penile cancer. Dr. Crook in bc, vancouver has produced amazing research in this regard. Read more...
"Brachy" is a. Greek root, meaning "short". The range of XRT is short, when the isotope is implanted, or applied through an opening. Cervix cancer is the prime use, but a subset of radiation oncologists are deeply interested, conceptually and technically, in delivering very high dose where the tumor is, and very little to adjacent tissues due to the short range. Read more...
Handful. Brachytherapy is a term used to describe the short acting nature of very high doses of radiation. It works close to the target to deliver dose without exposing many other tissues to dose. It is used most commonly in prostate and gyn cancers. It can b used in a lot of situations in well trained hands. Second most common uses are in the lung, breast, head and neck, esophagus, rectum, and skin. Read more...
Yes - many. Brachy is an art that requires skill as it can involves surgical methodologies. It is used in: sarcoma head and neck tumors gynecological tumors esophageal tumors (was used in cardiac stents before coating...) skin cancer breast cancer lung cancer pediatric cancers pelvic side wall tumors elegant work in lower resource locaitons (india) reminds one in the field that not all good work costs.... Read more...

Is brachytherapy helpful for a prostate cancer patient who has metastasized cancer cells?

No. Brachytherapy is used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, or cancer that has not spread outside of the prostate gland. If a patient has metastatic disease, treatments need to be systemic, with the aim of halting the growth & spread of the cancer throughout the body. These treatments include hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. Urologists & medical oncologists can help. Read more...
Possibly. Prostate cancer hurts you both from metastatic disease and locally. There is some evidence that treating the cancer (seeds for example) will decrease local problems. It doesn't cure the metastatic disease. www.peedoc.com. Read more...
No. Brachytherapy is a treatment for localized prostate cancer. If metastasis is present, the local treatment will not affect the distant cancer and will be of no overall benefit. Read more...

I need external beam radiation for prostate cancer, will it have any bad effects on the rest of me?

Radiation proctitis. I can only tell you what i see as a gastroenterologist. Radiation can cause inflammatory changes in the lining of the rectum called radiation proctitis. It can be treated by a gastroenterologist with argon gas therapy if it occurs. Good luck. Read more...
not too bad. The majority of men do very well with radiation. During treatment there can be some fatigue, urinary changes and possibly some loose stools. Late term there can be a risk for erectile dysfunction, small risk for long term urinary changes, and especially with newer radiation techniques a small chance of rectal bleeding (proctitis). Read more...
Outcomes for. Prostate cancer compare quite favorably with surgery: they now have robots; we now have techniques that limit doses to healthy tissues. Proctitis rate is about 3%. Some depends on target, dose, genetic issues. Fatigue is in 1/3; no longer does any one get loose bowels. Erectile dysfunction depends on what you bring: we do not restore magic to wands that do not work. Age, smoking, dm, lipids add. Read more...