Can radiation therapy treat diabetes?

No. Diabetes is caused when the pancreas does not produce any or enough Insulin for the body to be able to store glucose. Radiation has no possible ability to cause the pancreas to make insulin.
No. Radiation is most commonly used to treat cancer. It has no role in the management of diabetes.

Related Questions

What can be done to treat the side effects of radiation therapy?

Depends. On the site of radiation. It is always important to try to eat as balanced as possible. If you have a sore mouth, tell your doctor. If fatigued ask if you are anemic. But still walk!don't be a couch potato it just makes it worse. For sore /dry skin it depends at what course of treatment you are in. Ask your dr what you can put on it to make it better, as some things will make it worse. Read more...
Much ban be done. Radiation side-effects affect the particular area where radiation is given, not the whole bady. For eaxmple, in the mouth, there are medications and hygiene measures that help. In the bowel, diarrhea may occur and can be stopped with anti-diarrhea medicines. And so on for each body part. Most side-effects are temporary and reversible. Read more...

Are there any medications that can help treat the side effects of radiation therapy?

Yes. There are many medications that can be used to help treat the side effects of radiation. The specific side effects a patient gets while on treatment will depend on the area of the body that is being treated. Patients are evaluated by their radiation oncologist at least once per week at which time they should discuss their side effects with their physician so they can be treated appropriately. Read more...
Yes. Depending on the side effects and where in the body radiation is given there are many remedies and medications. There will be over the counter medications or prescription medications. The doctor visits with the patient once or more a week to assess these side effects and provide the correct remedy. Read more...

Can the same radiation therapy regimen treat two different types of cancer at the same time?

Yes. Unlike chemotherapy that has different drugs for different cancers, radiation is ionizing xrays that disrupt the dna. Therefore it is not cancer specific. It however has different sensitivies because each type of cancer behaves and responds differently and that is why we have different doses and techniques to use based on the cancer. Read more...
Yes. The organs must be in the same region since radiation is a local treatment. For example i had a patient with intermediate risk prostate cancer and anal cancer that received radiation to the pelvis and prostate for about 5.5 weeks ( overlapping regions that needed to be treated) followed by cyberknife boost to complete prostate treatment. Read more...
Yes. Occasionally, we see two different types of cancer within the same region e.g. Bladder and prostate cancer, rectum and prostate cancer and they may be treated simultaneously with the same radiation regime. However, the dose fractionation and overall dose will depend on the intent of the treatment and patient's condition. Read more...

Help please! Is chemotherapy or radiation therapy more commonly used to treat childhood leukaemia?

Pediatric cancer . Chemotherapy is commonly used for childhood leukemia. Radiation can also be a part of the treatment especially for prevention of brain recurrence. Read more...
More and more. We are moving away from cranial radiation in leukemia if we can. Leukemia cells use the central nervous system as a sanctuary site (ie., they hide there, and in the testes too). For patients with CNS disease at diagnosis, radiation is still a part of treatment. However, for CNS negative patients, we now use repeated intrathecal therapy for CNS prophylaxis. CNS relapse treatment involves radiation. Read more...

Can you tell me exactly when is radiation therapy used to treat cancer and when is chemotherapy used?

Local v. Systemic Rx. Cancer rx involves treating the organ where the cancer developed (local rx) as well as any cancer cells that may have broken away from the organ of origin and travelled elsewhere in the body (systemic rx). In general, surgery and radiation therapy are local rx whereas chemotherapy is designed to circulate throughout the body and kill cancer cells. Ideally, these 3 modalities work together for cure. Read more...
It depends. In early stage cancer (more likely to be cured), radiation therapy is often used with chemotherapy and rarely by itself. Chemo can be used by itself for curative purpose. In advanced cancer (unlikely to be cured), radiation can be used with or without chemotherapy mainly to palliate or alleviate symptoms such as bone pain. Chemo by itself can be used to alleviate symptoms and/or prolong survival. Read more...
Guideline based. Some tumors respond better to one or the other, or they may need to be given together or sequentially. The choice is mostly based on standard guidelines (nccn) that are evidence based with some degree of physician or institutional variation. Read more...

How to treat hypertthyroidism grave disease naturally without need to go through iodine radiation therapy?

No good option. I'm all for natural treatments when good ones are available but, in something as delicate as treating grave's disease, i would recommend the mainstream treaments. Have your doc explain all your options and then make an informed decision. Read more...

Can radiation therapy treat bone cancer?

Can treat myeloma. If bone cancer refers to multiple myeloma, then yes radiation therapy is used to treat myeloma. Usually this is a localized use such as around a pending fracture or there is a single plasmacytoma. It has also been used as total body irradiation in combination with chemotherapy for stem cell transplant. The most common use is to reduce pain quickly and is never curative. Read more...
Yes. Some people confuse bone cancer with when another type of cancer spreads to the bone (metastasis). Radiation can help the bone or the pain. As dr. Noga stated true bone cancer such as myeloma or plasmacytoma can also be treated with radiation. Other bone cancers, osteosarcoma or bone tumors may also have a role from radiation but surgery is usually the best for that type of bone cancers. Read more...
Depends on cancer. Some bone cancers, like ewing's sarcoma and multiple myeloma, are very sensitive to radiation, making it a good treatment option. Others, like osteosarcoma, don't respond well to radiation and radiation is only used as a last resort. When cancer, such as breast or prostate, spreads to bone, radiation is commonly used with good results. Read more...

Can pancreatic cancer be treated with radiation therapy?

Yes. Radiation alone is often used for palliation or local control. Some promising results with radiosurgery. It is rarely cured by radiation therapy alone. Read more...
Yes. Those that have resection still likely need radiation and chemotherapy. Those that are not resectable can also benefit. The outcome may not cause a cure as this cancer is aggressive. Radiation has a major role on treating pancreas cancer non the less. Read more...
Pancreas. Yes. The goals depend on what is hoped to be done. Radiotherapy does not cure pancca. It is used to improve chances of resection, prevent recurrence when resected if nodes or margins are positive. It is mostly used to relieve pain when chemotherapy no lnger works. Read more...
Yes. If the cancer has not spread to other parts of the body, radiation is one of the options to treat prostate cancer. Read more...
Pancreatic cancer. Radiation is usually a component of the overall treatment of localized pancreatic cancer along with surgery and chemotherapy. If the tumor has spread chemotherapy is usually the primary option. Radiation or radiation and chemotherapy can also be used on unresectable pancreatic cancers if need be. Read more...
Pancreas cancer. Yes; it is often combined with chemotherapy if the tumor is too large to surgically remove, or it is often given following surgery, if it can be removed (not wrapped around blood vessels, etc.). Read more...