5 doctors weighed in:

Hat what is the possibility that a nerve tissue receiving 90% damage can heal in the foot and ankle? The surgical procedure already used was to insert staples

5 doctors weighed in
2 doctors agree

In brief: Nerve damage

There is another answer that very accurately describes nerve damage and recovery times.
Your best source is your surgeon. Even if you are healed they are there for you. There are more questions that need to be answered before an accurate diagnosis can be made. Best of luck.

In brief: Nerve damage

There is another answer that very accurately describes nerve damage and recovery times.
Your best source is your surgeon. Even if you are healed they are there for you. There are more questions that need to be answered before an accurate diagnosis can be made. Best of luck.
Dr. Thomas Inwood
Dr. Thomas Inwood
Thank
Dr. Monica Wood
Surgery - Hand Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: It

It is not clear what your surgery was.
Staples can be used in the foot for a number of problems, though often to fuse arthritic joints. It is also unclear where "90% damage" comes from. Is that from nerve conduction velocities? Is that from intra-operative findings of a 90% severed nerve? Nerve injuries fall into 3 main categories: 1. Neurapraxias--these are stretch/bruise/compression injuries where the nerve is not disrupted. It usually takes around 3 months for the nerve to recover and these tend to do well. Nerve pain can be an issue while the nerve recovers. 2. Axonotmesis--these injuries involve disruption of some of the nerve fibers (axons), but not the outer structure of the nerve. These can recover by regrowing the axon. The nerve rests for about a month, then sprouts new axons which grow at a rate of about 1mm/day. Depending on the distance from the nerve injury to the target tissue (muscles or skin), the functional recovery can be quite good. However, after about 1 year, the muscles lose their ability to recognize nerve signals and cannot recover. 3. Neurotmesis--these injuries involve disruption of the nerve structure and may be partial or complete. In this case, the nerve will still try to grow new axons, but they may not find the other end of the nerve and may ball up into a painful nodule called a neuroma. These injuries have the worst outcomes. So, depending on the location and nature of the nerve injury, it may or may not recover. Often a waiting period of 3 months is used to allow injuries that will recover to do so. After that, surgery may be helpful, but has to be worth the anticipated benefits and recovery time.

In brief: It

It is not clear what your surgery was.
Staples can be used in the foot for a number of problems, though often to fuse arthritic joints. It is also unclear where "90% damage" comes from. Is that from nerve conduction velocities? Is that from intra-operative findings of a 90% severed nerve? Nerve injuries fall into 3 main categories: 1. Neurapraxias--these are stretch/bruise/compression injuries where the nerve is not disrupted. It usually takes around 3 months for the nerve to recover and these tend to do well. Nerve pain can be an issue while the nerve recovers. 2. Axonotmesis--these injuries involve disruption of some of the nerve fibers (axons), but not the outer structure of the nerve. These can recover by regrowing the axon. The nerve rests for about a month, then sprouts new axons which grow at a rate of about 1mm/day. Depending on the distance from the nerve injury to the target tissue (muscles or skin), the functional recovery can be quite good. However, after about 1 year, the muscles lose their ability to recognize nerve signals and cannot recover. 3. Neurotmesis--these injuries involve disruption of the nerve structure and may be partial or complete. In this case, the nerve will still try to grow new axons, but they may not find the other end of the nerve and may ball up into a painful nodule called a neuroma. These injuries have the worst outcomes. So, depending on the location and nature of the nerve injury, it may or may not recover. Often a waiting period of 3 months is used to allow injuries that will recover to do so. After that, surgery may be helpful, but has to be worth the anticipated benefits and recovery time.
Dr. Monica Wood
Dr. Monica Wood
Thank
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