Can radiation therapy cause nausea?

Yes. Since radiation affects both normal and cancerous cells, if your GI tract or brain are in the path of the radiation beam, there is a good chance that nausea will develop. We have excellent drugs to prevent chemotherapy or radiation therapy induced nausea, however.
Yes. Radiation is more likely to cause nausea when its aimed directly at the stomach or the fourth ventricle of the brain. Therefore not all or even many patients who are taking radiation get nauseated because these areas are not in the radiation fields. If they do we premedicate and can avert or greatly reduce this symptom.
Yes . The degree to which radiation therapy causes nausea depends on several factors: area treated, dose of radiation, whether it is given along with chemotherapy or not. As general rule, most patients tolerate treatment without significant nausea. And fortunately, there are good anti-nausea medications. .
Great question! Almost everyone thinks that radiotherapy causes awful nausea and vomiting. It almost neve does. In the olden days, whole body XRT was used, very rarely today. Big fields; total body, abdominal, thoracic, and whole brain can cause vomiting. We manage by lowering dose per exposure, and meds the quell nausea. It frankly is quite uncommon.

Related Questions

What is the best medicine for preventing nausea/vomiting due to radiation therapy of the pelvis?

The one that works . The best medicine will be the one that works for you. There are plenty of antimausea medication- from compazine, reglan, phenergan, (promethazine) ondansetron, steroids etc. Ginger also can help prevent/treat nausea. The most important here is for you to be proactive - take it before you vomit. Once you vomit- it will be hard for you to swallow any medication. Talk to your doc to give you any of the above. Read more...

Does prior radiation therapy cause IgG and lamba spike in bloodwork.

No. Neither radiation or Arimidex (anastrozole) will cause changes in immunoglobulins, substances made by white cells(particularly plasma cells) to fight infection and inflammation. If you are seeing an oncologist(due to being on arimidex) see if they can find old levels of igg or get a new one to see what the rate of rise is. Read more...
XRT for what? An igg with lambda spike is a cardinal sign of multiple myeloma. See your doctor for this. Read more...

Could radiation therapy for cancer cause other cancers in nearby organs later on?

Yes. This is indeed an area of concern in patients who have been treated with radiation, particularly if they received radiation therapy when younger in age. The younger the patient at the time of radiation treatment, the greater the chance of developing a secondary future malignancy. Read more...
Yes. It's one of the risks described in your consent form. This is also true about taking chemotherapy that other cancers are treatment related. However these risks are low and considered acceptable compared to the benefit that is expected from the treatment. Read more...
One in a... Radiation damages dna, and most of the time its repaired accurately. Most cancers require multiple genetic defects that multipy and compund when cells divide. The probability is very small, in the rang of 1 in 10, 000 to 1in a million...And then time. Younger people live long enough to allow rare events to emerge. It is very low risk, but needs to be weighed carefully. Read more...

Do you think my radiation therapy caused osteoencrosis in my hips?

Maybe. Radiation therapy has some side effect and may cause bone to weaken and can cause the bone to fracture . Read more...
It is possible. The hips are sensitive to the long-term effects of radiation. The dose to the hips, in which there is an increased risk of fracture, typically starts at 45 gy. You will need to ask your radiation oncologist to review your treatment plan to know the dose they received. Read more...

Could radiation therapy cause osteonecrosis of the hips?

Yes. If the hips get an amount of radiation above what this area can handle this complication can happen. This is why there is treatment planning and doctors limit radiation doses to the area of concern. However if treated no more than the maximum tolerance their is still 5 percent chance of complications at that maximum level. Read more...
Yes. Femoral head dose is always one of the issues we monitor for this very reason. Read more...