3 doctors weighed in:

I had shoulder surgery 3 months ago and I am still in severe pain my MRI from friday shows adhesive capsulitis, burisits and low-grade fraying and partial disruption of the anterior supraspinatus, i had a bursectomy etc why do I have these problems still

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Vivek Agrawal
Orthopedic Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Second Opinion

It is unclear from your question if you are having the same pain you were having prior to your shoulder operation and what the primary diagnosis was in recommending a shoulder operation? It is also not entirely clear to me what exactly was done during your operation and why? I recommend you consider a second opinion to first and foremost establish the primary and secondary diagnoses.

In brief: Second Opinion

It is unclear from your question if you are having the same pain you were having prior to your shoulder operation and what the primary diagnosis was in recommending a shoulder operation? It is also not entirely clear to me what exactly was done during your operation and why? I recommend you consider a second opinion to first and foremost establish the primary and secondary diagnoses.
Dr. Vivek Agrawal
Dr. Vivek Agrawal
Thank
Dr. Monica Wood
Surgery - Hand Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Shoulders

Shoulders are very complex with a lot of cooperating structures.
If you look at the joint itself, it has a very shallow "socket" and is aligned up-and-down so that gravity could easily pull the "ball" out of the "socket" without other things to stabilize it. Those stabilizers are the labral cartilage around the socket, the capsular ligaments around the joint, and the rotator cuff muscles, which are the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. It seems you are focusing on your current MRI findings. Taken in isolation, they have no meaning. We do not know what your images were like before your surgery nor what was done. "bursectomy" can include a fair amount of bony re-shaping as well as removing the subacromial bursa--a sack of fluid that sits between the roof of the shoulder, called the acromion, and the rotator cuff muscles. It is normal to have residual bright signal in the subacromial bursa (it grows back) after this kind of surgery and can be interpreted as "bursitis" on imaging. "partial disruption" of the anterior supraspinatus may have been there before surgery or could be progression of what you had before. Adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) can occur after any shoulder surgery, a shoulder injury, with diabetes, or from immobilizing the shoulder. You surgeon will have to determine if this is an overcall on the MRI or if you are indeed having symptoms and exam findings of a frozen shoulder. If you do have a frozen shoulder, you will need therapy and possibly other treatments to help mobilize it. Frozen shoulders can be painful, but it may or may not account for the pain you are having. Recovery from shoulder surgery often takes several months. Discuss the images and symptoms with your surgeon.

In brief: Shoulders

Shoulders are very complex with a lot of cooperating structures.
If you look at the joint itself, it has a very shallow "socket" and is aligned up-and-down so that gravity could easily pull the "ball" out of the "socket" without other things to stabilize it. Those stabilizers are the labral cartilage around the socket, the capsular ligaments around the joint, and the rotator cuff muscles, which are the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. It seems you are focusing on your current MRI findings. Taken in isolation, they have no meaning. We do not know what your images were like before your surgery nor what was done. "bursectomy" can include a fair amount of bony re-shaping as well as removing the subacromial bursa--a sack of fluid that sits between the roof of the shoulder, called the acromion, and the rotator cuff muscles. It is normal to have residual bright signal in the subacromial bursa (it grows back) after this kind of surgery and can be interpreted as "bursitis" on imaging. "partial disruption" of the anterior supraspinatus may have been there before surgery or could be progression of what you had before. Adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) can occur after any shoulder surgery, a shoulder injury, with diabetes, or from immobilizing the shoulder. You surgeon will have to determine if this is an overcall on the MRI or if you are indeed having symptoms and exam findings of a frozen shoulder. If you do have a frozen shoulder, you will need therapy and possibly other treatments to help mobilize it. Frozen shoulders can be painful, but it may or may not account for the pain you are having. Recovery from shoulder surgery often takes several months. Discuss the images and symptoms with your surgeon.
Dr. Monica Wood
Dr. Monica Wood
Thank
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