6 doctors weighed in:

Is it possible that a piece of tooth could get left behind during a wisdom tooth extraction? I had my wisdom teeth out in october. It's now january and i think I have a little piece of tooth that's working out of my gum on the bottom. It's sharp and a lit

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Majid Jamali
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Postoperative

Best thing to do is see your surgeon and take an x-ray and have a physical examination.

In brief: Postoperative

Best thing to do is see your surgeon and take an x-ray and have a physical examination.
Dr. Majid Jamali
Dr. Majid Jamali
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Dr. Matthew Hyde
Dentistry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes,

Yes, but it may be a loose piece of bone not just a broken piece of tooth.
They will usually resolve without issue but the best thing is to go back to your dentist and let them take a look to be safe. There are a few different options they can discuss with you.

In brief: Yes,

Yes, but it may be a loose piece of bone not just a broken piece of tooth.
They will usually resolve without issue but the best thing is to go back to your dentist and let them take a look to be safe. There are a few different options they can discuss with you.
Dr. Matthew Hyde
Dr. Matthew Hyde
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Dr. Gary Sandler
Dentistry

In brief: Yes, infrequently

Yes, one can have either a small fragment of bone or tooth lodged in a socket and unknown to the surgeon at the time of extraction, only to work its way to the surface over time.
Either wait until it come out on its own or see the dentist who extracted the tooth remove it.

In brief: Yes, infrequently

Yes, one can have either a small fragment of bone or tooth lodged in a socket and unknown to the surgeon at the time of extraction, only to work its way to the surface over time.
Either wait until it come out on its own or see the dentist who extracted the tooth remove it.
Dr. Gary Sandler
Dr. Gary Sandler
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Dr. Andrew Lutzker
Dentistry

In brief: It

It is always possible for a small piece of tooth to be inadvertently left behind during an extraction.
It could also be a piece of bone that has broken off. If you are having pain then you should definitely return to the doctor to be evaluated.

In brief: It

It is always possible for a small piece of tooth to be inadvertently left behind during an extraction.
It could also be a piece of bone that has broken off. If you are having pain then you should definitely return to the doctor to be evaluated.
Dr. Andrew Lutzker
Dr. Andrew Lutzker
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Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry

In brief: Yes,

Yes, some times a small piece of the tooth can break off when a wisdom tooth is being extracted.
In some cases, the wisdom tooth may need to be broken before if can be removed. If something feels jagged and sore, it is worth seeing your dentist back, so that he can examine you.

In brief: Yes,

Yes, some times a small piece of the tooth can break off when a wisdom tooth is being extracted.
In some cases, the wisdom tooth may need to be broken before if can be removed. If something feels jagged and sore, it is worth seeing your dentist back, so that he can examine you.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Dr. Heidi Fowler
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3 comments
Dr. David Schleimer
Many wisdom teeth (especially lower ones) are intentionally cut into 2 or more pieces rather than "broken". This is done so that minimal amounts of bone is removed, rather than expanding the hole or aperture the surgeon uses to visualize and remove the tooth.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Great point - thanks Dr. Schleimer.
Dr. David Schleimer
Dentistry - Orthodontics

In brief: Usually no

Tooth fragments are unlikely to be left behind if procedure was done by an oral surgeon, it is common however to have non-vital fragments of bone to separate and work their way out (like a splinter) this is called a bony sequestrum. Not usual, but it does occur.

In brief: Usually no

Tooth fragments are unlikely to be left behind if procedure was done by an oral surgeon, it is common however to have non-vital fragments of bone to separate and work their way out (like a splinter) this is called a bony sequestrum. Not usual, but it does occur.
Dr. David Schleimer
Dr. David Schleimer
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