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Should i get my heart checked? My heart flutters a lot at least 8-15 times a day if not more...Its starting to really worry me.? Could you please give me some answers....

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Guyton
Surgery - Thoracic
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Fluttering

Fluttering heartbeats are generally termed palpitations and can be triggered by stress, exercise, medication or sometimes by an underlying medical condition.
They are usually harmless. They can be a symptom of a more serious heart condition, such as an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) that may require treatment. Since you have frequent palpitations, you should see to your doctor to see if you need heart-monitoring tests to see if your palpitations are caused by a more serious heart problem. This evaluation could be urgently needed if your palpitations are accompanied by chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting or dizziness. Palpitations can be caused by stress or anxiety, exercise, fever, caffeine, nicotine, or stimulants in some medications. Occasionally heart palpitations are a sign of a serious problem, such as an overactive thyroid gland or an arrhythmia. Arrhythmias can be very fast, unusually slow, an irregular heart rhythm (atrial fibrillation). Atrial fibrillation can be a sign of underlying heart disease, such as mitral valve disease or other conditions that can cause stretching of the atria — the upper chambers of the heart. A cardiologist’s evaluation and an echocardiogram are often useful in ruling out some structural disease affecting your heart. If there is no structural heart disease, then the principal risk of atrial fibrillation is that blood clots may form in areas of the heart that are not contracting and possibly travel through the bloodstream to cause a stroke. This risk of a stroke is increased if you are over 65 years old; if you have high blood pressure; if you are female; if you have had a prior stroke, transient ischemic attack (or TIA — a fleeting stroke), or other blood clot disorder; if you have diabetes; if you have heart failure; or if you have known vascular disease (heart attack, aneurysm, or limitation of blood flow to the legs). The more risk factors you have the higher your risk of a stroke. With one risk factor, many physicians will recommend Aspirin therapy, or sometimes more potent blood thinners. With two or more risk factors, blood thinners are usually recommended. This should be discussed in detail with your doctor. Unless your palpitations signify of an underlying heart condition, there's little risk, but if there is an underlying heart condition, possible complications include fainting, stroke, heart failure, or it can cause your heart to stop beating effectively.

In brief: Fluttering

Fluttering heartbeats are generally termed palpitations and can be triggered by stress, exercise, medication or sometimes by an underlying medical condition.
They are usually harmless. They can be a symptom of a more serious heart condition, such as an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) that may require treatment. Since you have frequent palpitations, you should see to your doctor to see if you need heart-monitoring tests to see if your palpitations are caused by a more serious heart problem. This evaluation could be urgently needed if your palpitations are accompanied by chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting or dizziness. Palpitations can be caused by stress or anxiety, exercise, fever, caffeine, nicotine, or stimulants in some medications. Occasionally heart palpitations are a sign of a serious problem, such as an overactive thyroid gland or an arrhythmia. Arrhythmias can be very fast, unusually slow, an irregular heart rhythm (atrial fibrillation). Atrial fibrillation can be a sign of underlying heart disease, such as mitral valve disease or other conditions that can cause stretching of the atria — the upper chambers of the heart. A cardiologist’s evaluation and an echocardiogram are often useful in ruling out some structural disease affecting your heart. If there is no structural heart disease, then the principal risk of atrial fibrillation is that blood clots may form in areas of the heart that are not contracting and possibly travel through the bloodstream to cause a stroke. This risk of a stroke is increased if you are over 65 years old; if you have high blood pressure; if you are female; if you have had a prior stroke, transient ischemic attack (or TIA — a fleeting stroke), or other blood clot disorder; if you have diabetes; if you have heart failure; or if you have known vascular disease (heart attack, aneurysm, or limitation of blood flow to the legs). The more risk factors you have the higher your risk of a stroke. With one risk factor, many physicians will recommend Aspirin therapy, or sometimes more potent blood thinners. With two or more risk factors, blood thinners are usually recommended. This should be discussed in detail with your doctor. Unless your palpitations signify of an underlying heart condition, there's little risk, but if there is an underlying heart condition, possible complications include fainting, stroke, heart failure, or it can cause your heart to stop beating effectively.
Dr. Steven Guyton
Dr. Steven Guyton
Thank
Dr. Joshua Buckler
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Heart

Heart "flutters" or more generically, palpitations, can range from very benign to very serious depending on what the actual cause is.
Unfortunately the only way to accurately assess the cause is to capture the electrical rhythm of the heart during an episode. This can be done a variety of ways, but typically your physician will start off with an ECG and may also order a 24 or 48 hour continuous monitor called a "holter monitor". If neither of these tests show anything then there are additional options as well. Because there are potential high risk abnormalities associated with your symptoms, which also may vary depending on your other medical conditions, i would highly recommend that you see your primary physician and discuss this with them further and if needed make an appointment with a cardiologist.

In brief: Heart

Heart "flutters" or more generically, palpitations, can range from very benign to very serious depending on what the actual cause is.
Unfortunately the only way to accurately assess the cause is to capture the electrical rhythm of the heart during an episode. This can be done a variety of ways, but typically your physician will start off with an ECG and may also order a 24 or 48 hour continuous monitor called a "holter monitor". If neither of these tests show anything then there are additional options as well. Because there are potential high risk abnormalities associated with your symptoms, which also may vary depending on your other medical conditions, i would highly recommend that you see your primary physician and discuss this with them further and if needed make an appointment with a cardiologist.
Dr. Joshua Buckler
Dr. Joshua Buckler
Thank
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