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Are there any little tricks to speeding up the recovery of a broken bone? Any help is welcome, please... Im a collegiate women lacrosse player, and broke my leg skateboarding 2 & 1/2 weeks ago. I completely dislocated my ankle, and fractured my tib/fib..I

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Monica Wood
Surgery - Hand Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: There

There is nothing in the current state of technology that accelerates bone healing.
However, there are ways to slow it down. Too much activity too soon can cause motion at the fracture site that disrupts the healing tissue. Infection (more often with surgery, but can rarely happen without surgery) also delays healing. Smoking or any source of nicotine also slows bone healing, though i assume at your level of athletics, you are not a smoker. Anti-inflammatories (advil, aleve, aspirin, etc.) can be the hidden factor in a bone not healing and should be used sparingly, if at all. I agree that ligament healing after a dislocation is equally important with bone healing and can take longer. Some severe ligament injuries, such as the syndesmosis which holds the tibia and fibula together, can take more than 3 months to heal. While bone stimulators--devices that use electricity, magnets, or ultrasound to create an electrical field around the bone and promote healing--can help in people at risk for poor healing, they don't decrease healing time enough to get you back for the spring and do nothing to promote ligament healing that we're aware. It is very important to get good nutrition, including protein, calcium, and vitamin d for bone healing. It is also important to maintain whatever muscles you can by moving the parts that are not immobilized for the fracture/dislocation. While i assume the fractures occurred near your ankle, fractures higher in the leg also take a lot longer to heal, with the average time of healing being about 16 to 18 weeks for the midshaft tibia. Good luck with your recovery, but it looks like you're in a red shirt!

In brief: There

There is nothing in the current state of technology that accelerates bone healing.
However, there are ways to slow it down. Too much activity too soon can cause motion at the fracture site that disrupts the healing tissue. Infection (more often with surgery, but can rarely happen without surgery) also delays healing. Smoking or any source of nicotine also slows bone healing, though i assume at your level of athletics, you are not a smoker. Anti-inflammatories (advil, aleve, aspirin, etc.) can be the hidden factor in a bone not healing and should be used sparingly, if at all. I agree that ligament healing after a dislocation is equally important with bone healing and can take longer. Some severe ligament injuries, such as the syndesmosis which holds the tibia and fibula together, can take more than 3 months to heal. While bone stimulators--devices that use electricity, magnets, or ultrasound to create an electrical field around the bone and promote healing--can help in people at risk for poor healing, they don't decrease healing time enough to get you back for the spring and do nothing to promote ligament healing that we're aware. It is very important to get good nutrition, including protein, calcium, and vitamin d for bone healing. It is also important to maintain whatever muscles you can by moving the parts that are not immobilized for the fracture/dislocation. While i assume the fractures occurred near your ankle, fractures higher in the leg also take a lot longer to heal, with the average time of healing being about 16 to 18 weeks for the midshaft tibia. Good luck with your recovery, but it looks like you're in a red shirt!
Dr. Monica Wood
Dr. Monica Wood
Thank
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Spring

Spring season is out of the question, based on the injuries you describe.
And trying to force it early will result in permanant injury. Bone healing takes 6 weeks. The ankle dislocation is the real problem. The ligaments will need 56 weeks to heal, and then, and only then can physical therapy start to restore range of motion and strength. Listen to what your orthopaedic surgeon tells you like it is the word of god. That is the best trick for a speedy recovery.

In brief: Spring

Spring season is out of the question, based on the injuries you describe.
And trying to force it early will result in permanant injury. Bone healing takes 6 weeks. The ankle dislocation is the real problem. The ligaments will need 56 weeks to heal, and then, and only then can physical therapy start to restore range of motion and strength. Listen to what your orthopaedic surgeon tells you like it is the word of god. That is the best trick for a speedy recovery.
Dr. J. C. DiGiacomo
Dr. J. C. DiGiacomo
Thank
Dr. Pamela Pappas
Psychiatry

In brief: Bad injury

Sorry to hear about this injury.
Dr. Wood has given you great information about the nature of healing. In some people though, the homeopathic remedy symphytum at 30c has helped promote fracture healing. You'll still need to stay off your leg, allowing xrays to document your progress before playing sports again. A homeopathic doctor may be able to help, along w/your other physicians.

In brief: Bad injury

Sorry to hear about this injury.
Dr. Wood has given you great information about the nature of healing. In some people though, the homeopathic remedy symphytum at 30c has helped promote fracture healing. You'll still need to stay off your leg, allowing xrays to document your progress before playing sports again. A homeopathic doctor may be able to help, along w/your other physicians.
Dr. Pamela Pappas
Dr. Pamela Pappas
Thank
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