4 doctors weighed in:

I've been diagnosed with glaucoma. Thirty years ago i had a problem with chronic eye infections.At the time i was a heavy smoker i've been diagnosed with glaucoma. Thirty years ago i had a problem with chronic eye infections.At the time i was a heavy smok

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Goldstein
Ophthalmology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: It

It is interesting that your pressures were high during your episode of uveitis.
Usually the pressure is low during those episodes. This means one of 2 things. First, if you were on steroid drops, you may have been having a 'steroid response glaucoma' which gets better when you are off the drops. Another possibility is that you did not actually have uveitis, but rather a disease called posner-schlossman syndrome, or glaucomatocycltic disease. This imitates uveitis, and tends to be recurrent.

In brief: It

It is interesting that your pressures were high during your episode of uveitis.
Usually the pressure is low during those episodes. This means one of 2 things. First, if you were on steroid drops, you may have been having a 'steroid response glaucoma' which gets better when you are off the drops. Another possibility is that you did not actually have uveitis, but rather a disease called posner-schlossman syndrome, or glaucomatocycltic disease. This imitates uveitis, and tends to be recurrent.
Dr. William Goldstein
Dr. William Goldstein
Thank
Dr. Thomas Henderson
Ophthalmology

In brief: Intraocular

Intraocular pressure higher than the tissue of your optic nerve will tolerate without damage is essentail to lose sight from glaucoma.
The other major risk factors are age over 55, larger hollowed area in the optic nerve (cupping) and thinner corneas. Infection generally will not increase risk of glaucoma, but chronic uveitis (inflammation without infection or it's treatment with steroid medication may lead to temporary or occasionally longer lasting high intraocular pressure. Given the 30 year interval in this case, the earlier episode is not likely a cause of the current condition. Appropriately aggressive treatment of intraocular pressure to levels low enough to prevent damage to the tissue of your eye should allow you to maintain the eyesight you need as long as you need it.

In brief: Intraocular

Intraocular pressure higher than the tissue of your optic nerve will tolerate without damage is essentail to lose sight from glaucoma.
The other major risk factors are age over 55, larger hollowed area in the optic nerve (cupping) and thinner corneas. Infection generally will not increase risk of glaucoma, but chronic uveitis (inflammation without infection or it's treatment with steroid medication may lead to temporary or occasionally longer lasting high intraocular pressure. Given the 30 year interval in this case, the earlier episode is not likely a cause of the current condition. Appropriately aggressive treatment of intraocular pressure to levels low enough to prevent damage to the tissue of your eye should allow you to maintain the eyesight you need as long as you need it.
Dr. Thomas Henderson
Dr. Thomas Henderson
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Dr. John Kim
Ophthalmology

In brief: Uvitis

Uvitis is not an infection.
It is an inflammation of the uvea which your iris is part of. Chronic uveitis can cause peripheral anterior synechiae which can lead to secondary glaucoma.

In brief: Uvitis

Uvitis is not an infection.
It is an inflammation of the uvea which your iris is part of. Chronic uveitis can cause peripheral anterior synechiae which can lead to secondary glaucoma.
Dr. John Kim
Dr. John Kim
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