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Pain during sex I have been complaining to my doctor and gyno. For years about my pain during sex. It's so painful it makes me cry. I don't even like sex now. I never used to have this problem. I always had an awesome sex life until the last few years

1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry

In brief: Chronic

Chronic or recurrent pain during, before or after intercourse is called dyspareunia.
There are a number of possible physical causes. You mentioned a history of sexually transmitted diseases. One possible complication of sexually transmitted diseases or infections is pelvic inflammatory disease. There are a variety of other conditions such as enodometriosis which could cause pain during intercourse. If the woman’s genital area is not lubricated it could lead to pain. Some medications can cause a decrease in lubrication. You indicated that you developed this problem just prior to leaving your last partner. If there is not a change in your medical status, no injuries, no new medications which might impact sexual arousal or vaginal lubrication, no adverse reactions to new methods of birth control; have not had a baby recently, you are not perimenopausal etc; then it might be appropriate to look at other possible factors. A woman’s vagina becomes lubricated when she is sexually stimulated. If your partner is not aware of how to arouse you or there is inadequate foreplay, you might not be adequately lubricated prior to penile penetration. If there is tension in the relationship with your partner or if there is a lot of stress in general, that can effect your sexual response. If there has been a previous history of sexual abuse, even if you have been having satisfactory sex, it might create symptoms at a later time. I recommend that you give your partner feedback if there is inadequate foreplay or provide specifics about what you find stimulating. I recommend that the next time you talk with your doctor or gynecologist that you tell him/ her directly that painful sex is impacting your life and that you want to be evaluated specifically for this problem. It is important however, that if you want the focus to be on dyspareunia that you don’t bring it up in the context of a number of different medical issues. Hopefully, your medical provider will be responsive to your concern using this approach.

In brief: Chronic

Chronic or recurrent pain during, before or after intercourse is called dyspareunia.
There are a number of possible physical causes. You mentioned a history of sexually transmitted diseases. One possible complication of sexually transmitted diseases or infections is pelvic inflammatory disease. There are a variety of other conditions such as enodometriosis which could cause pain during intercourse. If the woman’s genital area is not lubricated it could lead to pain. Some medications can cause a decrease in lubrication. You indicated that you developed this problem just prior to leaving your last partner. If there is not a change in your medical status, no injuries, no new medications which might impact sexual arousal or vaginal lubrication, no adverse reactions to new methods of birth control; have not had a baby recently, you are not perimenopausal etc; then it might be appropriate to look at other possible factors. A woman’s vagina becomes lubricated when she is sexually stimulated. If your partner is not aware of how to arouse you or there is inadequate foreplay, you might not be adequately lubricated prior to penile penetration. If there is tension in the relationship with your partner or if there is a lot of stress in general, that can effect your sexual response. If there has been a previous history of sexual abuse, even if you have been having satisfactory sex, it might create symptoms at a later time. I recommend that you give your partner feedback if there is inadequate foreplay or provide specifics about what you find stimulating. I recommend that the next time you talk with your doctor or gynecologist that you tell him/ her directly that painful sex is impacting your life and that you want to be evaluated specifically for this problem. It is important however, that if you want the focus to be on dyspareunia that you don’t bring it up in the context of a number of different medical issues. Hopefully, your medical provider will be responsive to your concern using this approach.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Dr. Heidi Fowler
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