2 doctors weighed in:

I have noticed the last 3 - 6 months that my ring finger on my right hand seems to get stiff ..And freezes when I am holding a utensil...It usually just lasted a few seconds.Today if was wrapped around a tissue and froze... It did not want to pop back...

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Gluck
Surgery - Hand Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: The

The most common cause of a finger that "freezes" and "pops" is a so called trigger finger, a type of tendonitis.
You should certainly have it checked out especially since you've had the problem for so long. If it turns out to be a trigger finger, and the diagnosis is pretty straightforward, it is fairly easy to treat right in the office. Best of luck.

In brief: The

The most common cause of a finger that "freezes" and "pops" is a so called trigger finger, a type of tendonitis.
You should certainly have it checked out especially since you've had the problem for so long. If it turns out to be a trigger finger, and the diagnosis is pretty straightforward, it is fairly easy to treat right in the office. Best of luck.
Dr. Robert Gluck
Dr. Robert Gluck
Thank
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
Surgery - Hand Surgery

In brief: Locking,

Locking, popping and snapping especially after holding something with force typically represents a trigger finger or stenosing tenosynovitis ( the same thing!).
This occurs because the tight loop of tissue in the palm often refried to as a pulley becomes less flexible and the tendon that glides through this structure binds, catches or gets caught. Often there is aching in the palm at the bas of the finger and it can still be called a trigger finger even if it does not lock up. Occasionally there is so much swelling that to prevent locking u someone stops bending the finger and shows up with s stiff finger that won't bend much at all. Splinting often does t work as the tendons get thickened and stuck to each other limiting their excursion and once the bending starts again the problem returns. Injections of cortisone can work. Some studies say that between 70 -90% of trigger fingers may get better with injection alone. Diabetics and others with a reasom for decreased circulation or increased soft tissue swelling such as those with inflammatory arthritis may not benefit as often form injections. Antiinflammatories are often tried as well. If conservative treatment fails, a surgical release is often done. The surgeon divides the pulley fora short distance in the palm. After the surgical tenderness subsides most will rapidly regain range of motion but occasionally therapy s needed, especially in someone who may not have had full range of motion prior to surgery or if there are any systemic issues. From where i sit, trigger finger seems to be one of the most common misunderstood diagnoses. It is a common problem and if treated early many get respectable results with injection. However for those who do not get better, surgery works well and speedily.

In brief: Locking,

Locking, popping and snapping especially after holding something with force typically represents a trigger finger or stenosing tenosynovitis ( the same thing!).
This occurs because the tight loop of tissue in the palm often refried to as a pulley becomes less flexible and the tendon that glides through this structure binds, catches or gets caught. Often there is aching in the palm at the bas of the finger and it can still be called a trigger finger even if it does not lock up. Occasionally there is so much swelling that to prevent locking u someone stops bending the finger and shows up with s stiff finger that won't bend much at all. Splinting often does t work as the tendons get thickened and stuck to each other limiting their excursion and once the bending starts again the problem returns. Injections of cortisone can work. Some studies say that between 70 -90% of trigger fingers may get better with injection alone. Diabetics and others with a reasom for decreased circulation or increased soft tissue swelling such as those with inflammatory arthritis may not benefit as often form injections. Antiinflammatories are often tried as well. If conservative treatment fails, a surgical release is often done. The surgeon divides the pulley fora short distance in the palm. After the surgical tenderness subsides most will rapidly regain range of motion but occasionally therapy s needed, especially in someone who may not have had full range of motion prior to surgery or if there are any systemic issues. From where i sit, trigger finger seems to be one of the most common misunderstood diagnoses. It is a common problem and if treated early many get respectable results with injection. However for those who do not get better, surgery works well and speedily.
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
Thank
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