7 doctors weighed in:
Can hypertrophic cardiomyopathy reverse itself in children?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. Steven Neish
Pediatrics - Cardiology
3 doctors agree
In brief: No
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a disease caused by an abnormal gene, typically in one of the genes that codes for the contractile proteins of the heart.
At the current time, there are no therapies that can make abnormal genes "reverse" and become normal. Having said that, there are best practices for hcm, even in childhood and best care can result in prolonged life and good long-term outcomes.

In brief: No
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a disease caused by an abnormal gene, typically in one of the genes that codes for the contractile proteins of the heart.
At the current time, there are no therapies that can make abnormal genes "reverse" and become normal. Having said that, there are best practices for hcm, even in childhood and best care can result in prolonged life and good long-term outcomes.
Dr. Steven Neish
Dr. Steven Neish
Thank
Dr. Barton Cook
Pediatrics - Cardiology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Not a cure
The symptoms and thickening of the heart muscle can improve with treatment.
Abnormal rhythms can improve. In true hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the heart muscle cells are structurally abnormal, and remain so.

In brief: Not a cure
The symptoms and thickening of the heart muscle can improve with treatment.
Abnormal rhythms can improve. In true hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the heart muscle cells are structurally abnormal, and remain so.
Dr. Barton Cook
Dr. Barton Cook
Thank
Dr. Cornelia Franz
Pediatrics
In brief: Maybe
Everyday people have illnesses that were thought terminal or untreatable reverse.
So why not cardiomyopathy in a child. This is a big answer to your question and a lot of information is needed...Like how bad is it? Is it bad enough to be on a transplant list? What caused it? Etc. Or if it is already reversing, you have your answer. I am not advising to abandon medical care...

In brief: Maybe
Everyday people have illnesses that were thought terminal or untreatable reverse.
So why not cardiomyopathy in a child. This is a big answer to your question and a lot of information is needed...Like how bad is it? Is it bad enough to be on a transplant list? What caused it? Etc. Or if it is already reversing, you have your answer. I am not advising to abandon medical care...
Dr. Cornelia Franz
Dr. Cornelia Franz
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Rashed Hasan
Board Certified, Pediatrics - Critical Care
30 years in practice
802K people helped
Continue
107,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors