10 doctors weighed in:

Are genetics involved if a child has a dilated cardiomyopathy?

10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jay Park
Pediatrics
5 doctors agree

In brief: Yes, in some cases

Nearly 20 % of cases of dilated cardiomyopathy have a familial basis.

In brief: Yes, in some cases

Nearly 20 % of cases of dilated cardiomyopathy have a familial basis.
Dr. Jay Park
Dr. Jay Park
Thank
Dr. Steven Neish
Pediatrics - Cardiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Frequently

Current evidence supports that at least 35% of patients with nonsyndromic dilated cardiomyopathy are familial (probably genetic) or genetic in etiology.
Defects in contractile proteins, sarcolemmal proteins, and ion channel proteins have been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. Most have an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, but there are autosomal recessive and x-linked defects.

In brief: Frequently

Current evidence supports that at least 35% of patients with nonsyndromic dilated cardiomyopathy are familial (probably genetic) or genetic in etiology.
Defects in contractile proteins, sarcolemmal proteins, and ion channel proteins have been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. Most have an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, but there are autosomal recessive and x-linked defects.
Dr. Steven Neish
Dr. Steven Neish
Thank
Dr. Mohammed Numan
Pediatrics - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Could be

There are several genetic locations have been identified in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy which can be mutation or inhereted.

In brief: Could be

There are several genetic locations have been identified in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy which can be mutation or inhereted.
Dr. Mohammed Numan
Dr. Mohammed Numan
Thank
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