9 doctors weighed in:

How do I remove a mole? I have a mole on my breast. It almost looks like a large freckle. I also have a mole on my bikini line.

9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barry Handler
Surgery - Plastics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Others

Others here have described moles that need to be checked out for fear of cancer.
The important thing to understand is that the only way to completely remove a true mole is to completely remove the entire thickness of skin encompassing the mole. This means there will be a permanent scar no matter how inconspicuous it may eventually turn out. Also, most moles are roughly round in shape leaving a round hole in the skin after removal that does not lend itself to a simple closure. If the circle is small, say 2-3 mm then a simple closure may work. Wounds larger than 3mm will not lay down flat with simply closing them using stitches. They need to be elongated into an ellipse to close properly. Many patients have trouble understanding why removing a 6mm mole will result in a scar 1.5 cm long. That is why it is important to try and decide if the mole is being removed for cosmetic reasons or medical reasons. Any mole can be biopsied with a 2mm skin punch to determine if there is medical reason to remove it with little to no visible scarring. Any person seeking cosmetic mole removal needs to weigh the appearance of the mole versus what the scar would look like if it healed well and if it healed not so well.

In brief: Others

Others here have described moles that need to be checked out for fear of cancer.
The important thing to understand is that the only way to completely remove a true mole is to completely remove the entire thickness of skin encompassing the mole. This means there will be a permanent scar no matter how inconspicuous it may eventually turn out. Also, most moles are roughly round in shape leaving a round hole in the skin after removal that does not lend itself to a simple closure. If the circle is small, say 2-3 mm then a simple closure may work. Wounds larger than 3mm will not lay down flat with simply closing them using stitches. They need to be elongated into an ellipse to close properly. Many patients have trouble understanding why removing a 6mm mole will result in a scar 1.5 cm long. That is why it is important to try and decide if the mole is being removed for cosmetic reasons or medical reasons. Any mole can be biopsied with a 2mm skin punch to determine if there is medical reason to remove it with little to no visible scarring. Any person seeking cosmetic mole removal needs to weigh the appearance of the mole versus what the scar would look like if it healed well and if it healed not so well.
Dr. Barry Handler
Dr. Barry Handler
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1 comment
Dr. Ronald Achong
Great answer. I agree 100%
Dr. Mia Skourtis
Surgery - Plastics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: There

There are many different types of pigmented skin lesions, or moles.
Some of these may be present for your whole life and never demonstrate any significant change. Typically, these are the characteristics of a benign (non-cancerous) mole. Moles become more concerning when they begin to exhibit change and abcd characteristics (asymmetry, irregular borders, change, and diameter greater than 6cm). Any changing skin lesion should be evaluated by your board certified plastic surgeon or dermatologist to determine whether a biopsy should be performed. Typically, a small mole will be evaluated with an "excisional biopsy, " or complete removal of the mole and evaluation by a pathologist. A larger mole or skin lesion may initially be evaluated with an "incisional or punch biopsy, " which will remove a piece of the mole to determine if any additional treatment is necessary. Scarring is usually minimal with either technique, and while the scar of an excisional biopsy may be slightly longer than the diameter of the original mole, the scar is usually less noticeable than the mole was. When in doubt, please have your doctor take a look! all the best, dr. Skourtis.

In brief: There

There are many different types of pigmented skin lesions, or moles.
Some of these may be present for your whole life and never demonstrate any significant change. Typically, these are the characteristics of a benign (non-cancerous) mole. Moles become more concerning when they begin to exhibit change and abcd characteristics (asymmetry, irregular borders, change, and diameter greater than 6cm). Any changing skin lesion should be evaluated by your board certified plastic surgeon or dermatologist to determine whether a biopsy should be performed. Typically, a small mole will be evaluated with an "excisional biopsy, " or complete removal of the mole and evaluation by a pathologist. A larger mole or skin lesion may initially be evaluated with an "incisional or punch biopsy, " which will remove a piece of the mole to determine if any additional treatment is necessary. Scarring is usually minimal with either technique, and while the scar of an excisional biopsy may be slightly longer than the diameter of the original mole, the scar is usually less noticeable than the mole was. When in doubt, please have your doctor take a look! all the best, dr. Skourtis.
Dr. Mia Skourtis
Dr. Mia Skourtis
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Dr. Robert Brueck
Surgery - Plastics

In brief: I

I think the most important thing is to have it looked at by a plastic surgeon or dermatologist to see if it is benign and can be frozen off or cauterized.
Some moles may be precursors to melanoma and are better excised and sent of for analysis by a pathologist.

In brief: I

I think the most important thing is to have it looked at by a plastic surgeon or dermatologist to see if it is benign and can be frozen off or cauterized.
Some moles may be precursors to melanoma and are better excised and sent of for analysis by a pathologist.
Dr. Robert Brueck
Dr. Robert Brueck
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Dr. David Levens
Surgery - Plastics

In brief: The

The medical term for a "mole" is a nevus which is usually a pigmented (typically brown) growth that may be flat or raised.
The majority of moles are completely normal and do not require removal unless they show abnormal signs such as changing or irregular appearance. A dermatologist is trained to identify potentially abnormal moles which can then be biopsied (with or without complete removal) to allow microscopic examination by a pathologist. To minimize scarring especially in cosmetically sensitive areas, plastic surgeons usually get involved either initially or at the request of the dermatolgist and/or patient.

In brief: The

The medical term for a "mole" is a nevus which is usually a pigmented (typically brown) growth that may be flat or raised.
The majority of moles are completely normal and do not require removal unless they show abnormal signs such as changing or irregular appearance. A dermatologist is trained to identify potentially abnormal moles which can then be biopsied (with or without complete removal) to allow microscopic examination by a pathologist. To minimize scarring especially in cosmetically sensitive areas, plastic surgeons usually get involved either initially or at the request of the dermatolgist and/or patient.
Dr. David Levens
Dr. David Levens
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Dr. Darryl Blinski
Surgery - Plastics

In brief: Seek

Seek in person evaluation from a boarded derm or ps in your area.
They will determine if an excisional or incisional biopsy is needed. In orlando drs jeff maftus or jeff hartog can help you.

In brief: Seek

Seek in person evaluation from a boarded derm or ps in your area.
They will determine if an excisional or incisional biopsy is needed. In orlando drs jeff maftus or jeff hartog can help you.
Dr. Darryl Blinski
Dr. Darryl Blinski
Thank
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