2 doctors weighed in:

Do air purifiers (or air cleaners) reduce a person's chance of lung cancer? Would having high quality air purifiers at home and in my office at work reduce my chance of getting cancer? I live in an area with bad air pollution. I don't know if these devic

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Nathan Pennell
Internal Medicine - Oncology

In brief: Unknown, can't hurt

The best way to reduce the risk of lung cancer is to avoid tobacco smoke, either smoking yourself or second hand smoke.
In areas with high pollution, hepa filters may sounds reasonable but unless you live in a bubble you'll still be exposed to inhaled pollutants. There is no evidence that filters prevent lung cancer, but may help other issues like allergies, asthma, and general qol!

In brief: Unknown, can't hurt

The best way to reduce the risk of lung cancer is to avoid tobacco smoke, either smoking yourself or second hand smoke.
In areas with high pollution, hepa filters may sounds reasonable but unless you live in a bubble you'll still be exposed to inhaled pollutants. There is no evidence that filters prevent lung cancer, but may help other issues like allergies, asthma, and general qol!
Dr. Nathan Pennell
Dr. Nathan Pennell
Thank
Dr. Joseph Jeu
Family Medicine

In brief: There

There are super hepa room air purifiers which can markedly decrease the pollution in the air. Some are efficient enough to even filter out virus sized particles.
Some are also configured to filter out chemical pollutants from the air. Although i know of no studies which specifically address your your question, we know that the reverse is true. Second hand smoke and air pollution are known to increase your risk of developing lung cancer. I have used and am currently using good hepa filters in our office. Personally i think the air smells cleaner, is less viscous, my staff and i suffer less allergies since using it. In your situation, you might seriously consider using one.

In brief: There

There are super hepa room air purifiers which can markedly decrease the pollution in the air. Some are efficient enough to even filter out virus sized particles.
Some are also configured to filter out chemical pollutants from the air. Although i know of no studies which specifically address your your question, we know that the reverse is true. Second hand smoke and air pollution are known to increase your risk of developing lung cancer. I have used and am currently using good hepa filters in our office. Personally i think the air smells cleaner, is less viscous, my staff and i suffer less allergies since using it. In your situation, you might seriously consider using one.
Dr. Joseph Jeu
Dr. Joseph Jeu
Thank
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