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Was my surgery on my finger necessary? In september 2010 i smashed m finger and i went to st. Joseph hospital because the cut in my finger was about two inches long and showed what appears to be bone. The hospital doctor reviewed my finger and a upon a s

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
Surgery - Hand Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: It

It is very difficult in an open from such as this to answer your specific question.
So i can not do that. What i can tell you is that a laceration on a finger that crosses the creases or folds at a certain setoff angles will initially not sam to affect the finger but with regular healing lead to a contracture ( or tightening) of the scar and creases. The case of a laceration and missing skin that is closed tightly , this may occur too. One way to prevent this tightening is to "break up" the scar with additional inciosns at special angles to the laceration or scar and or add skin of skin graft. Even in this situation with a well applied and oriented skin graft and a well done surgical release of a tight scar, further tightening an contracture can occur. So it may seem that initially a finger feels loose, but later feels tighter. One has to ask, "what if the skin graft wsa nver done?" and the answer may be that if it were not done that the finger would feel even worse than it does now. If someone has a result of a procedure that they are not happy with, the best thing is to go back to that doctor or seek the advance of another and see if anyitng else can be or needs to be done rather than question the need for the first procedure. Bu hopefully by reading the previous paragraph you you understand the complexity of this situation and that while initially a finger may seem looser, it can tighten up just by the direction of the scar that forms. Finally there are other factors, general health, compliance, motion, pain, smoking, alcohol, genetics and many other factors that affect scar and scar tissue formation. Some are prone to keloids, others to dupuytrens contracture. Some have subtle arthritis in a joint adjacent to a scar while others have a concurrent joint injury ( a sprain) that leads to increased stiffness

In brief: It

It is very difficult in an open from such as this to answer your specific question.
So i can not do that. What i can tell you is that a laceration on a finger that crosses the creases or folds at a certain setoff angles will initially not sam to affect the finger but with regular healing lead to a contracture ( or tightening) of the scar and creases. The case of a laceration and missing skin that is closed tightly , this may occur too. One way to prevent this tightening is to "break up" the scar with additional inciosns at special angles to the laceration or scar and or add skin of skin graft. Even in this situation with a well applied and oriented skin graft and a well done surgical release of a tight scar, further tightening an contracture can occur. So it may seem that initially a finger feels loose, but later feels tighter. One has to ask, "what if the skin graft wsa nver done?" and the answer may be that if it were not done that the finger would feel even worse than it does now. If someone has a result of a procedure that they are not happy with, the best thing is to go back to that doctor or seek the advance of another and see if anyitng else can be or needs to be done rather than question the need for the first procedure. Bu hopefully by reading the previous paragraph you you understand the complexity of this situation and that while initially a finger may seem looser, it can tighten up just by the direction of the scar that forms. Finally there are other factors, general health, compliance, motion, pain, smoking, alcohol, genetics and many other factors that affect scar and scar tissue formation. Some are prone to keloids, others to dupuytrens contracture. Some have subtle arthritis in a joint adjacent to a scar while others have a concurrent joint injury ( a sprain) that leads to increased stiffness
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
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Dr. Boris Aronzon
Anesthesiology

In brief: 2 nd opinion

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In brief: 2 nd opinion

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Dr. Boris Aronzon
Dr. Boris Aronzon
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