8 doctors weighed in:

I have been told I have sciatica but its not getting better I have pain in my lower back into my butt into both legs and down to my feet the pain is very sharp and i can not move its mainly in my left leg and thigh and lower back my leg goes numb and ting

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Qamar Khan
Pain Management
4 doctors agree

In brief: Given Your Pain

I would suggest seeing a pain/spine specialist to evaluate you further to evaluate what level and what can be done to treat you.
There are interventional treatments besides medications and surgeries that might reduce or eliminate the pain altogether.

In brief: Given Your Pain

I would suggest seeing a pain/spine specialist to evaluate you further to evaluate what level and what can be done to treat you.
There are interventional treatments besides medications and surgeries that might reduce or eliminate the pain altogether.
Dr. Qamar Khan
Dr. Qamar Khan
Thank
Dr. Joy Jackson
Family Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Physical

Physical therapy and accupuncture have been shown to provide relief to those suffering from sciatica.
Also a consult from a pain management specialist may be in order if everything you have tried includes multiple medications. Have you informed your doctor of your persistent pain? If so what alternative treatments/medications have been offered? Feel free to respond good luck.

In brief: Physical

Physical therapy and accupuncture have been shown to provide relief to those suffering from sciatica.
Also a consult from a pain management specialist may be in order if everything you have tried includes multiple medications. Have you informed your doctor of your persistent pain? If so what alternative treatments/medications have been offered? Feel free to respond good luck.
Dr. Joy Jackson
Dr. Joy Jackson
Thank
Dr. Stephen Christensen
Family Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Low

Low back pain is one of the most common conditions seen by primary care physicians, and a significant number of patients develop chronic back pain, either with or without sciatica.
(sciatica is a term used to describe pain, warmth, numbness or other unusual sensations radiating along the path of the sciatic nerve from your buttock into your leg and foot.) when a patient complains of pain going down both legs, it's possible he or she is suffering from spinal stenosis, which is a narrowing of the spinal canal caused by herniated disks and/or arthritis. You didn't mention whether you'd had an MRI to identify the specific cause of your symptoms. If not, this might be useful in guiding your therapy. Many doctors don't order MRI right away for patients without sciatica because a trial of medications, physical therapy and other remedies is worthwhile in these patients, and those that improve don't need mri. However, individuals with symptoms of sciatica or spinal stenosis usually undergo MRI fairly early in the course of their management. Once an MRI is obtained, a variety of treatment modalities can be used to treat sciatica or spinal stenosis. If a patient is not improving on maximum recommended doses of medications (acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, tramadol, muscle relaxants, etc.), physical therapy, chiropractic manipulation, acupuncture, and other conservative measures, referral to a surgeon or pain management specialist is reasonable. It isn't clear from your question how many of these modalities you've tried, nor is it clear how extensive your workup has been. Since your symptoms persist despite your best efforts, it's time to see your doctor again to see where you go from here. Good luck!

In brief: Low

Low back pain is one of the most common conditions seen by primary care physicians, and a significant number of patients develop chronic back pain, either with or without sciatica.
(sciatica is a term used to describe pain, warmth, numbness or other unusual sensations radiating along the path of the sciatic nerve from your buttock into your leg and foot.) when a patient complains of pain going down both legs, it's possible he or she is suffering from spinal stenosis, which is a narrowing of the spinal canal caused by herniated disks and/or arthritis. You didn't mention whether you'd had an MRI to identify the specific cause of your symptoms. If not, this might be useful in guiding your therapy. Many doctors don't order MRI right away for patients without sciatica because a trial of medications, physical therapy and other remedies is worthwhile in these patients, and those that improve don't need mri. However, individuals with symptoms of sciatica or spinal stenosis usually undergo MRI fairly early in the course of their management. Once an MRI is obtained, a variety of treatment modalities can be used to treat sciatica or spinal stenosis. If a patient is not improving on maximum recommended doses of medications (acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, tramadol, muscle relaxants, etc.), physical therapy, chiropractic manipulation, acupuncture, and other conservative measures, referral to a surgeon or pain management specialist is reasonable. It isn't clear from your question how many of these modalities you've tried, nor is it clear how extensive your workup has been. Since your symptoms persist despite your best efforts, it's time to see your doctor again to see where you go from here. Good luck!
Dr. Stephen Christensen
Dr. Stephen Christensen
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