15 doctors weighed in:

Will I need a cpap machine during surgery if I have sleep apnea?

15 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mehran Farid-Moayer
Internal Medicine
12 doctors agree

In brief: No

It depends on the type of anesthesia.
Often CPAP is not needed during the surgery, but may be needed after the surgery. For general anesthesia, the anesthesiologist puts an endotracheal tube and ventilates the patient using mechanical ventilation. This eliminates the need for cpap.

In brief: No

It depends on the type of anesthesia.
Often CPAP is not needed during the surgery, but may be needed after the surgery. For general anesthesia, the anesthesiologist puts an endotracheal tube and ventilates the patient using mechanical ventilation. This eliminates the need for cpap.
Dr. Mehran Farid-Moayer
Dr. Mehran Farid-Moayer
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Dr. Gary Lederman
Dentistry
2 doctors agree

In brief: No

During surgery, the anesthesiologist supports your airway, either with mask ventilation or intubation.
Essentially, the doctor is your cpap, and breathes for you. Be sure to tell the md about your apnea, as it has many health effects and may influence how you are sedated or managed.

In brief: No

During surgery, the anesthesiologist supports your airway, either with mask ventilation or intubation.
Essentially, the doctor is your cpap, and breathes for you. Be sure to tell the md about your apnea, as it has many health effects and may influence how you are sedated or managed.
Dr. Gary Lederman
Dr. Gary Lederman
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Dr. Louis Gallia
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

No. The anesthesiologist will use a endotracheal tube to keep the airway patent.

In brief: No

No. The anesthesiologist will use a endotracheal tube to keep the airway patent.
Dr. Louis Gallia
Dr. Louis Gallia
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: No way

Anesthesiologist will monitor your breathing and should have everything under control.
I would let the surgeon (should actually be aware of this from your health history prior to surgery, ) know that you have this issue.

In brief: No way

Anesthesiologist will monitor your breathing and should have everything under control.
I would let the surgeon (should actually be aware of this from your health history prior to surgery, ) know that you have this issue.
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
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