6 doctors weighed in:

When someone has a cataplexy attack, can they vocalize (like moaning)?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brian Affleck
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: Cataplexy

Is a sudden and transient episode of loss of muscle tone accompanied by full conscious awareness, often triggered by strong emotions such as laughing, crying, or being scared.
Speech is often slurred, but vocalization is possible unless there is total collapse, but it usually only lasts for a short time with complete recovery from seconds to minutes.

In brief: Cataplexy

Is a sudden and transient episode of loss of muscle tone accompanied by full conscious awareness, often triggered by strong emotions such as laughing, crying, or being scared.
Speech is often slurred, but vocalization is possible unless there is total collapse, but it usually only lasts for a short time with complete recovery from seconds to minutes.
Dr. Brian Affleck
Dr. Brian Affleck
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Dr. Aaron Milstone
Internal Medicine - Pulmonology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Cataplexy is a part of narcolepsy where patients will experience weakness in her lower extremities such as their legs or are in the face.
Usually cataplexy is caused by emotion such as laughing or anger. Vocalization and the ability to moan remains intact in most patients with cataplexy.

In brief: Yes

Cataplexy is a part of narcolepsy where patients will experience weakness in her lower extremities such as their legs or are in the face.
Usually cataplexy is caused by emotion such as laughing or anger. Vocalization and the ability to moan remains intact in most patients with cataplexy.
Dr. Aaron Milstone
Dr. Aaron Milstone
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