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My duahgter just spilled very hot soup on her lap, and now has a quarter sized blister on her thigh... Should i take her to an e.R. Or is there something i can use at home to make it feel a little better?

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Miller
Wound care

In brief: Simple is best

A blister is when the body reacts to trauma (burn, friction, etc) by creating a water filled cushion to protect the area.
This is natural response and should be protected with a simple dressing. Change it every other day and as needed. Gentle cleansing. Because the skin is intact, risk of infection is zero. If it pops, cover with a simple dressing to protect underlying tissues. It will heal fine.

In brief: Simple is best

A blister is when the body reacts to trauma (burn, friction, etc) by creating a water filled cushion to protect the area.
This is natural response and should be protected with a simple dressing. Change it every other day and as needed. Gentle cleansing. Because the skin is intact, risk of infection is zero. If it pops, cover with a simple dressing to protect underlying tissues. It will heal fine.
Dr. Michael Miller
Dr. Michael Miller
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Dr. Laura McMullen
Pediatrics

In brief: There

There are three burn classifications which will help you know what to do.
1) first degree burn: usually just redness swelling and pain. Unless it involves large areas of the hands, face, groin, feet, buttocks, or major joint, you can treat the area as a minor burn. If the burn does involve the areas listed, you should call your doctor or go to the emergency room. 2) second degree burn: pain, redness, swelling and blistering. As long as the burn is less than 3 inches wide and doesn't involve the body parts listed above, you can treat it as a minor burn. (it sounds as if your daughter has a small 2nd degree burn) you should call your doctor or go to the emergency room if the burn is larger than 3 inches or involves the body parts listed above. 3) third degree burn: is the most serious and the area may not hurt (from nerve damage) and can appear either black or white and dry. This needs emergent medical attention and you should call 911 or go to the emergency room. Treatment of minor burns: 1) cool the burn by running it under cold water for 10-15 minutes or applying cold compresses (do not use ice). 2) cover the burn loosely with a gauze 3) take an NSAID such as Ibuprofen for treatment of inflammation and pain relief. 4) do not apply butter or ointments. Do not pop any blisters. 5) keep area clean and dry. Watch for sign and symptoms of infection such as increased redness, swelling, drainage, pain or fever. Call your doctor with any questions.

In brief: There

There are three burn classifications which will help you know what to do.
1) first degree burn: usually just redness swelling and pain. Unless it involves large areas of the hands, face, groin, feet, buttocks, or major joint, you can treat the area as a minor burn. If the burn does involve the areas listed, you should call your doctor or go to the emergency room. 2) second degree burn: pain, redness, swelling and blistering. As long as the burn is less than 3 inches wide and doesn't involve the body parts listed above, you can treat it as a minor burn. (it sounds as if your daughter has a small 2nd degree burn) you should call your doctor or go to the emergency room if the burn is larger than 3 inches or involves the body parts listed above. 3) third degree burn: is the most serious and the area may not hurt (from nerve damage) and can appear either black or white and dry. This needs emergent medical attention and you should call 911 or go to the emergency room. Treatment of minor burns: 1) cool the burn by running it under cold water for 10-15 minutes or applying cold compresses (do not use ice). 2) cover the burn loosely with a gauze 3) take an NSAID such as Ibuprofen for treatment of inflammation and pain relief. 4) do not apply butter or ointments. Do not pop any blisters. 5) keep area clean and dry. Watch for sign and symptoms of infection such as increased redness, swelling, drainage, pain or fever. Call your doctor with any questions.
Dr. Laura McMullen
Dr. Laura McMullen
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