3 doctors weighed in:

Will surgery for a deviated septum help with sleep apnea? I've had sinus problems for 20 years. I recently learned that had a deviated septum. I don’t sleep well and my wife says my breathing at night is very loud and disruptive. .

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mike Deldar
Dentistry - Cosmetic

In brief: Definitely will help

Less obstruction on the airway you are better able to breath.

In brief: Definitely will help

Less obstruction on the airway you are better able to breath.
Dr. Mike Deldar
Dr. Mike Deldar
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Dr. Thomas Lamperti
Facial Plastic Surgery

In brief: Whether

Whether nasal surgery including septoplasty will help with sleep apnea depends a lot on how bad your septal deviation is.
Certainly, improving your nasal breathing can help with improving your overall airflow. Whether this has any significant effect on your sleep apnea depends a lot on how severe your sleep apnea is. Septal surgery alone is very unlikely to cure sleep apnea as often there is an obstructive component lower in the throat that nasal surgery doesn't address. However, nasal surgery can make a CPAP easier to tolerate. For people that snore but don't have sleep apnea I have found that nasal surgery alone can improve this symptom by reducing chronic mouth breathing at night.

In brief: Whether

Whether nasal surgery including septoplasty will help with sleep apnea depends a lot on how bad your septal deviation is.
Certainly, improving your nasal breathing can help with improving your overall airflow. Whether this has any significant effect on your sleep apnea depends a lot on how severe your sleep apnea is. Septal surgery alone is very unlikely to cure sleep apnea as often there is an obstructive component lower in the throat that nasal surgery doesn't address. However, nasal surgery can make a CPAP easier to tolerate. For people that snore but don't have sleep apnea I have found that nasal surgery alone can improve this symptom by reducing chronic mouth breathing at night.
Dr. Thomas Lamperti
Dr. Thomas Lamperti
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Dr. Thomas Benda
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery

In brief: Hi.

Hi. The big question in every case of snoring is "do you have sleep apnea?" if you are overly tired and have a history of high blood pressure, the answer is probably yes.
Visiting an ear nose and throat doctor who treats snoring and sleep apnea would help answer your questions. Most of the noise of snoring occurs back in your throat, not in your nose. The tissue around your tonsils, if still there, soft palate, uvula, and back of tongue vibrate as you breathe while asleep and make the noise we call snoring. Your nose may contribute to this also. The deviated septum can decrease how much air you take in while you sleep and while awake, and a stuffy nose can wake people up in the night. So the next big question is "do you have trouble breathing out of your nose?" not all deviated septums are significant. Usually the first thing we try for stuffy nose is a steroid nasal spray, like generic flonase. You need a good evaluation of your nose, looking for polyps, swelling of nasa tissue called turbinates, and signs of chronic sinus infection. Treating your stuffy nose might help snoring, and may help you sleep better. Treating your stuffy nose , either medically or surgically with a septoplasty and turbinate surgery , will not fix sleep apnea. It may allow you to wear a CPAP mask more comfortably, which is the most common, and usually best treatment for sleep apnea. It usually takes a sleep study to determine if you have sleep apnea. If you do not, there are procedures that can be done on the palate or tongue that may help your snoring. There are also dental appliances that can help some snoring and some mild sleep apnea. If you can't tolerate cpap, sometimes surgery of your throat and or tongue is advised. Again, go visit your ENT doctor.

In brief: Hi.

Hi. The big question in every case of snoring is "do you have sleep apnea?" if you are overly tired and have a history of high blood pressure, the answer is probably yes.
Visiting an ear nose and throat doctor who treats snoring and sleep apnea would help answer your questions. Most of the noise of snoring occurs back in your throat, not in your nose. The tissue around your tonsils, if still there, soft palate, uvula, and back of tongue vibrate as you breathe while asleep and make the noise we call snoring. Your nose may contribute to this also. The deviated septum can decrease how much air you take in while you sleep and while awake, and a stuffy nose can wake people up in the night. So the next big question is "do you have trouble breathing out of your nose?" not all deviated septums are significant. Usually the first thing we try for stuffy nose is a steroid nasal spray, like generic flonase. You need a good evaluation of your nose, looking for polyps, swelling of nasa tissue called turbinates, and signs of chronic sinus infection. Treating your stuffy nose might help snoring, and may help you sleep better. Treating your stuffy nose , either medically or surgically with a septoplasty and turbinate surgery , will not fix sleep apnea. It may allow you to wear a CPAP mask more comfortably, which is the most common, and usually best treatment for sleep apnea. It usually takes a sleep study to determine if you have sleep apnea. If you do not, there are procedures that can be done on the palate or tongue that may help your snoring. There are also dental appliances that can help some snoring and some mild sleep apnea. If you can't tolerate cpap, sometimes surgery of your throat and or tongue is advised. Again, go visit your ENT doctor.
Dr. Thomas Benda
Dr. Thomas Benda
Thank
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