2 doctors weighed in:

When a cell is mutated during cloning, is it the same affect as a child who is a victim of inbreeding? I need to know for a school essay

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Janice Olson
Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

In brief: I

I am in agreement with the prior response, but i would add that a "weak spot" in the dna - a place that is vulnerable to breakage or to change - is a weak spot and it does not matter whether the break in the dna happens because of artificial manipulation (as in cloning) or naturally (as in inherited gene defects).
It is true that some diseases in humans require only 1 "mistake" in 1 copy of the gene and other diseases require that the same mistake occur in both copies of the gene before the disease state becomes evident or damaging. For example, in sickle cell anemia, if one of your 2 copies of chromosome 11 has a mistake at Amino Acid number 6 in the globin gene, you have sickle cell trait, a condition with almost no symptoms or noticeable abnormalities, not the full blown disease. But, if both copies of that chromosome 11 have the exact same mutation, the individual will have sickle cell anemia, a life-long disease characterized by recurring painful episodes, severe anemia, jaundice, and high risk of strokes, heart failure, kidney failure and chronic lung disease. On the other hand, many cases of classic hemophilia are caused by a single break in the dna of the x chromosome followed by a repair error - the broken off piece gets stuck back in the chromosome where it is supposed to be, but it is "upside down" or inverted.

In brief: I

I am in agreement with the prior response, but i would add that a "weak spot" in the dna - a place that is vulnerable to breakage or to change - is a weak spot and it does not matter whether the break in the dna happens because of artificial manipulation (as in cloning) or naturally (as in inherited gene defects).
It is true that some diseases in humans require only 1 "mistake" in 1 copy of the gene and other diseases require that the same mistake occur in both copies of the gene before the disease state becomes evident or damaging. For example, in sickle cell anemia, if one of your 2 copies of chromosome 11 has a mistake at Amino Acid number 6 in the globin gene, you have sickle cell trait, a condition with almost no symptoms or noticeable abnormalities, not the full blown disease. But, if both copies of that chromosome 11 have the exact same mutation, the individual will have sickle cell anemia, a life-long disease characterized by recurring painful episodes, severe anemia, jaundice, and high risk of strokes, heart failure, kidney failure and chronic lung disease. On the other hand, many cases of classic hemophilia are caused by a single break in the dna of the x chromosome followed by a repair error - the broken off piece gets stuck back in the chromosome where it is supposed to be, but it is "upside down" or inverted.
Dr. Janice Olson
Dr. Janice Olson
Thank
Dr. Jason Terk
Pediatrics

In brief: Not

Not exactly.
We have two copies of most of our genes carried on our 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in every cell in our body. Some genes are dominant which means that what is coded on the gene is expressed when only one copy of the gene is present. Other genes are recessive which means that both copies of the gene must be present for that gene to be expressed. Most abnormal genes that cause diseases and malformations are recessive genes. So, for those people that have such genetic diseases or malformations, they had to get a recessive gene copy from each of their parents. Because closely related people have similar genes (less genetic diversity), there is a much greater chance of one of these diseases occurring if closely related people have children together; they have a greater chance of contributing the same recessive gene to their child.

In brief: Not

Not exactly.
We have two copies of most of our genes carried on our 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in every cell in our body. Some genes are dominant which means that what is coded on the gene is expressed when only one copy of the gene is present. Other genes are recessive which means that both copies of the gene must be present for that gene to be expressed. Most abnormal genes that cause diseases and malformations are recessive genes. So, for those people that have such genetic diseases or malformations, they had to get a recessive gene copy from each of their parents. Because closely related people have similar genes (less genetic diversity), there is a much greater chance of one of these diseases occurring if closely related people have children together; they have a greater chance of contributing the same recessive gene to their child.
Dr. Jason Terk
Dr. Jason Terk
Thank
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