5 doctors weighed in:

Will surgery for a lazy eye (strabismus) help my eyelid become less droopy?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Todd Sisto
Breast Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

Different operations.

In brief: No

Different operations.
Dr. Todd Sisto
Dr. Todd Sisto
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Dr. Otto Placik
Surgery - Plastics

In brief: Other Surgery

A droopy eyelid is known as either lagophthalmos and/or blepharoptosis.
This may due to a variety of mechanical or neurologic or congenital causes. Numerous surgical options are available but depend on the severity of the condition. Strabismus is an entirely different condition involving the eyeball (globe) and not the eyelid.

In brief: Other Surgery

A droopy eyelid is known as either lagophthalmos and/or blepharoptosis.
This may due to a variety of mechanical or neurologic or congenital causes. Numerous surgical options are available but depend on the severity of the condition. Strabismus is an entirely different condition involving the eyeball (globe) and not the eyelid.
Dr. Otto Placik
Dr. Otto Placik
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Dr. Darab Hormozi
Surgery - Plastics

In brief: No

Strabismus surgery corrects the position of your eyeball muscles.
The eyelid muscle that produces droopiness is separate and can be corrected in a separate procedure. One muscle( superior rectus) on the eyeball has a joint root with the eyelid muscle and if the one is corrected, it may improve the ptosis.

In brief: No

Strabismus surgery corrects the position of your eyeball muscles.
The eyelid muscle that produces droopiness is separate and can be corrected in a separate procedure. One muscle( superior rectus) on the eyeball has a joint root with the eyelid muscle and if the one is corrected, it may improve the ptosis.
Dr. Darab Hormozi
Dr. Darab Hormozi
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Dr. Robert Alexander
Surgery - Plastics

In brief: No

The surgery for strabismus will not alter any eyelid droopiness, as the surgery is for extra-ocular muscles only (those that move the eyeball) and not for lid opening muscles.
That muscle is known as the levator aponeurosis and is responsible for holding the upper lid position and providing maximal opening when used.

In brief: No

The surgery for strabismus will not alter any eyelid droopiness, as the surgery is for extra-ocular muscles only (those that move the eyeball) and not for lid opening muscles.
That muscle is known as the levator aponeurosis and is responsible for holding the upper lid position and providing maximal opening when used.
Dr. Robert Alexander
Dr. Robert Alexander
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