5 doctors weighed in:

Is cataract surgery the only solution for getting rid of cataracts? I would like to find the best solution for treating the cataract in my right eye. I am wondering if surgery is the only solution or if there are other options available. If they are avail

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Dieck
Ophthalmology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Correction of cataracts (clouding of the natural lens) can only be corrected through surgical intervention.
Surgery is only recommended after changing spectacle prescriptions no longer can improve the vision satisfactorily.

In brief: Yes

Correction of cataracts (clouding of the natural lens) can only be corrected through surgical intervention.
Surgery is only recommended after changing spectacle prescriptions no longer can improve the vision satisfactorily.
Dr. William Dieck
Dr. William Dieck
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Dr. Jay Bradley
Ophthalmology - LASIK Surgery

In brief: Cataract

If the cataract is blocking vision, then surgery is your only and best option.
Occasionally, patients will see some improvement in vision by using dilating eye drops (phenylephrine). Ask your eye doctor.

In brief: Cataract

If the cataract is blocking vision, then surgery is your only and best option.
Occasionally, patients will see some improvement in vision by using dilating eye drops (phenylephrine). Ask your eye doctor.
Dr. Jay Bradley
Dr. Jay Bradley
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Dr. Sayed Jovkar
Ophthalmology

In brief: The

The lens in the eye is made mostly of water and protein.
The protein molecule is arranged such that it is crystal clear thereby allowing light passing thorough to the retina analogous to a film in a camera. With age, the protein in the lens changes (becomes "denatured") and it becomes physically cloudy. This creates visual symptoms. Some studies suggest that ultraviolet light is also associated with cataract formation. Medical problems such as diabetes increase the rate of progression of cataracts. Many medications such as steroids, etc do also contribute to an increased rate of cataract formation. Risk factors include genetics, smoking, poor diet, and heavy alcohol consumption, and many others. Initially when symptoms of cataract (such as blurred vision, glare, difficulty with driving at night, etc) appear, one may able to improve vision with glasses, improved lighting, and other visual aids. An attempt to reduce the risk factors, some mentioned above is important. If cataracts interfere with active daily living activities, and the quality of vision with correction is not satisfactory, after consultation with an ophthalmologist, one may consider cataract surgery. Except in certain situations, cataract surgery is elective, meaning that it is ultimately a decision made by the patient after considering pros/cons of cataract surgery. -- the information above is of general medical nature and does not constitute medical advice or treatment. It does not create a patient-doctor relationship. It is not a substitute for an opinion from an ophthalmologist who has personally examined your eyes. -- sayed jovkar, md, msc, frcsc www.Jovkar.Com los gatos, california.

In brief: The

The lens in the eye is made mostly of water and protein.
The protein molecule is arranged such that it is crystal clear thereby allowing light passing thorough to the retina analogous to a film in a camera. With age, the protein in the lens changes (becomes "denatured") and it becomes physically cloudy. This creates visual symptoms. Some studies suggest that ultraviolet light is also associated with cataract formation. Medical problems such as diabetes increase the rate of progression of cataracts. Many medications such as steroids, etc do also contribute to an increased rate of cataract formation. Risk factors include genetics, smoking, poor diet, and heavy alcohol consumption, and many others. Initially when symptoms of cataract (such as blurred vision, glare, difficulty with driving at night, etc) appear, one may able to improve vision with glasses, improved lighting, and other visual aids. An attempt to reduce the risk factors, some mentioned above is important. If cataracts interfere with active daily living activities, and the quality of vision with correction is not satisfactory, after consultation with an ophthalmologist, one may consider cataract surgery. Except in certain situations, cataract surgery is elective, meaning that it is ultimately a decision made by the patient after considering pros/cons of cataract surgery. -- the information above is of general medical nature and does not constitute medical advice or treatment. It does not create a patient-doctor relationship. It is not a substitute for an opinion from an ophthalmologist who has personally examined your eyes. -- sayed jovkar, md, msc, frcsc www.Jovkar.Com los gatos, california.
Dr. Sayed Jovkar
Dr. Sayed Jovkar
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