2 doctors weighed in:

July 2010 our sweet precious33 yr daughter was diagnosed with cervical cancer that has metastasized to her lymph nodes & brain. Our daughter lives in another city now getting treatment & was in another state when she got her 1st treatment and has been thr

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lauren Stegman
Radiation Oncology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: I

I am sorry that your daughter's disease has progressed and that she is still in pain.
I suggest she see a good pain medicine doctor, preferably one who was trained as an anesthesiologist. There is something called an intrathecal pain pump. It is implanted under the skin of the stomach and a catheter is tunneled under the skin directly into the fluid around the spinal cord. It slowly puts pain medicine directly around the spinal cord similar to how women get an epidural for pain during child birth. This can sometimes control pain that is difficult to control with oral, intravenous, or skin-patch narcotics and a randomized trial comparing intrathecal pain pumps to these other medicines also suggested that people with the pumps live a bit longer, probably due to less side effects from the pain medicine. Patients can walk and do their normal activity with the pump, but there can be side effects and an experienced doctor is needed to place and manage the pump. There is also a possibility that some of her pain could be controlled with radiation to the back if the pain is from tumor in the spine and that a short course of radiation could help shrink or slow down growth of her neck tumor. I wish you the best.

In brief: I

I am sorry that your daughter's disease has progressed and that she is still in pain.
I suggest she see a good pain medicine doctor, preferably one who was trained as an anesthesiologist. There is something called an intrathecal pain pump. It is implanted under the skin of the stomach and a catheter is tunneled under the skin directly into the fluid around the spinal cord. It slowly puts pain medicine directly around the spinal cord similar to how women get an epidural for pain during child birth. This can sometimes control pain that is difficult to control with oral, intravenous, or skin-patch narcotics and a randomized trial comparing intrathecal pain pumps to these other medicines also suggested that people with the pumps live a bit longer, probably due to less side effects from the pain medicine. Patients can walk and do their normal activity with the pump, but there can be side effects and an experienced doctor is needed to place and manage the pump. There is also a possibility that some of her pain could be controlled with radiation to the back if the pain is from tumor in the spine and that a short course of radiation could help shrink or slow down growth of her neck tumor. I wish you the best.
Dr. Lauren Stegman
Dr. Lauren Stegman
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Eric Weisman
Board Certified, Neurology
33 years in practice
9M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors