2 doctors weighed in:

I am doing a report/project on polio is there any information you could give me? I need a first hand resource

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Osman Farooq
Pediatrics - Neurology

In brief: Website

A good resource to prepare a report is http://en.
Wikipedia.Org/wiki/polio.

In brief: Website

A good resource to prepare a report is http://en.
Wikipedia.Org/wiki/polio.
Dr. Osman Farooq
Dr. Osman Farooq
Thank
Dr. Herbert Krob
Neurology

In brief: Polio,

Polio, also called poliomyelitis, is known to most people as an infectious, paralytic illness caused by a virus appropriately called "poliovirus.
" it is a great subject for a report, because there are so many ways to make it interesting for you and for your audience. Writing a report for school is not really about the finished product. It is mostly about developing and practicing a set of skills that will help you the rest of your life. Learning how to be inquisitive and curious is the starting point. (yes, you can learn how to be inquisitive.) other skills that you can develop and practice include: how to define your topic. For example, a report on the topic "polio" would probably be uninteresting because there is no way to tell people something they don't already know in a short report on such a big subject. A report on "how polio informed the acting career of donald sutherland" would be more interesting because it offers a chance to learn something that the reader may not have even thought about, like -- wow! did donald sutherland have polio? How to ask questions in a way that gets you the information you need. For example, when you asked the question "is there any information you can give me?" you might not have been expecting information about how to write a report. In the age of search engines like google it is very important to know how to ask questions so that you aren't disappointed or overwhelmed by the answers. Also, remember that a report is really a series of answers to questions that aren't actually written into the report. Hopefully, they are questions that your audience is asking themselves, and hoping you will answer. How to determine if the answers you get are good quality. This is super important. There are lots of sources of information out there, but not all of them are good. Sources like wikipedia ( http://en.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/poliomyelitis ) are better (wait -- what is it about wikipedia that makes it better than an ordinary web page?) but don't exactly tell your teacher you really tried. You might want to see if google has a way of finding more-scholarly sources of information (hint -- they do). Getting good sources might get you an "a." if you want an "a+" you could find and visit a polio survivor and get a firsthand story of polio in your town or city. Learning how to attribute your information correctly. People like research scientists and poets discover new facts and create new ideas. The rest of us mostly combine old ideas or facts, hopefully in new ways. Because the ideas we combine aren't ours, but someone else's hard work, it's important to give them credit for it. Are there any standard ways to give credit to people whose work you use? (hint -- there is.) learning how to organize your work and budget your time for your project. Many people leave things like reports to the last minute. In many cases, the last minute is too late: the library is closed... The power goes out. Learning how manage the time involved in doing a report will give you skills that will make you successful in any career. How to benchmark (or measure) your work against others or against expectations. Before you sink all your effort and time into finalizing your report, you may want to stop at the rough and bring your work to your teacher. Showing them your rough work will show the teach that the work is yours, will show the teacher you are trying hard, and will give you an opportunity to correct things before its too late. I know that this wasn't the answer you were expecting, but i'd be very surprised if following these suggestions doesn't get you a top grade.

In brief: Polio,

Polio, also called poliomyelitis, is known to most people as an infectious, paralytic illness caused by a virus appropriately called "poliovirus.
" it is a great subject for a report, because there are so many ways to make it interesting for you and for your audience. Writing a report for school is not really about the finished product. It is mostly about developing and practicing a set of skills that will help you the rest of your life. Learning how to be inquisitive and curious is the starting point. (yes, you can learn how to be inquisitive.) other skills that you can develop and practice include: how to define your topic. For example, a report on the topic "polio" would probably be uninteresting because there is no way to tell people something they don't already know in a short report on such a big subject. A report on "how polio informed the acting career of donald sutherland" would be more interesting because it offers a chance to learn something that the reader may not have even thought about, like -- wow! did donald sutherland have polio? How to ask questions in a way that gets you the information you need. For example, when you asked the question "is there any information you can give me?" you might not have been expecting information about how to write a report. In the age of search engines like google it is very important to know how to ask questions so that you aren't disappointed or overwhelmed by the answers. Also, remember that a report is really a series of answers to questions that aren't actually written into the report. Hopefully, they are questions that your audience is asking themselves, and hoping you will answer. How to determine if the answers you get are good quality. This is super important. There are lots of sources of information out there, but not all of them are good. Sources like wikipedia ( http://en.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/poliomyelitis ) are better (wait -- what is it about wikipedia that makes it better than an ordinary web page?) but don't exactly tell your teacher you really tried. You might want to see if google has a way of finding more-scholarly sources of information (hint -- they do). Getting good sources might get you an "a." if you want an "a+" you could find and visit a polio survivor and get a firsthand story of polio in your town or city. Learning how to attribute your information correctly. People like research scientists and poets discover new facts and create new ideas. The rest of us mostly combine old ideas or facts, hopefully in new ways. Because the ideas we combine aren't ours, but someone else's hard work, it's important to give them credit for it. Are there any standard ways to give credit to people whose work you use? (hint -- there is.) learning how to organize your work and budget your time for your project. Many people leave things like reports to the last minute. In many cases, the last minute is too late: the library is closed... The power goes out. Learning how manage the time involved in doing a report will give you skills that will make you successful in any career. How to benchmark (or measure) your work against others or against expectations. Before you sink all your effort and time into finalizing your report, you may want to stop at the rough and bring your work to your teacher. Showing them your rough work will show the teach that the work is yours, will show the teacher you are trying hard, and will give you an opportunity to correct things before its too late. I know that this wasn't the answer you were expecting, but i'd be very surprised if following these suggestions doesn't get you a top grade.
Dr. Herbert Krob
Dr. Herbert Krob
Thank
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