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Can prolonged Adderall use lead to heart problems? I am a 27 year old guy. I'm in great physical shape, and have never experienced any health issues. I do have add, and have been prescribed Adderall for a couple of years. I take about 30mg per day on aver

9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Glen Elliott
Pediatrics - Psychiatry
6 doctors agree

In brief: Should be fine

Used appropriately, Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) & other stimulants are quite safe.
They can elevate pulse rate & blood pressure, but studies have not shown this creates increased risk. Abuse of stimulants, usually at much higher doses than those used to treat adhd can cause heart problems & even death. A recent study of many thousands of subjects showed no change in risk of heart problems related to stimulants.

In brief: Should be fine

Used appropriately, Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) & other stimulants are quite safe.
They can elevate pulse rate & blood pressure, but studies have not shown this creates increased risk. Abuse of stimulants, usually at much higher doses than those used to treat adhd can cause heart problems & even death. A recent study of many thousands of subjects showed no change in risk of heart problems related to stimulants.
Dr. Glen Elliott
Dr. Glen Elliott
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Dr. Laura McMullen
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine)

Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) belongs to a class of medications called amphetamine salts which are commonly used for the treatment of attention deficit disorder. Common side effects are: -upset stomach -loss of appetite and/or weight loss -insomnia -restlessness or anxiety -rebound symptoms (symptoms of add when the medication wears off in the evening) if you are experiencing any of these side effects talk with your doctor - many adverse symptoms can be improved! rarer side effects: - cardiac arrest or other severe cardiac problems (especially with misuse or abuse of amphetamine).
This is why people with heart defects such as valve problems or a hole in the heart wall, people with uncontrolled high blood pressure, or people with blood vessel disease should not use this medication. -increased blood pressure and/or heart rate. This should be monitored as the medication is adjusted. Tell your doctor about any feelings or "racing heart". -involuntary muscle twitches called "tics". -panic attacks, delusions, hallucinations, and severe anxiety the only known long-term effect is mild growth suppression in kids and this usually improves over time.

In brief: Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine)

Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) belongs to a class of medications called amphetamine salts which are commonly used for the treatment of attention deficit disorder. Common side effects are: -upset stomach -loss of appetite and/or weight loss -insomnia -restlessness or anxiety -rebound symptoms (symptoms of add when the medication wears off in the evening) if you are experiencing any of these side effects talk with your doctor - many adverse symptoms can be improved! rarer side effects: - cardiac arrest or other severe cardiac problems (especially with misuse or abuse of amphetamine).
This is why people with heart defects such as valve problems or a hole in the heart wall, people with uncontrolled high blood pressure, or people with blood vessel disease should not use this medication. -increased blood pressure and/or heart rate. This should be monitored as the medication is adjusted. Tell your doctor about any feelings or "racing heart". -involuntary muscle twitches called "tics". -panic attacks, delusions, hallucinations, and severe anxiety the only known long-term effect is mild growth suppression in kids and this usually improves over time.
Dr. Laura McMullen
Dr. Laura McMullen
Thank
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