9 doctors weighed in:

Sometimes he loses control, kicking and screaming, it hurts! how do I get him to calm down?

9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Laura Webb
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: A new TipTap

During tantrums such as these make sure your child is safe (ie: put them in their crib) and then ignore the behavior. This is the best way to stop the tantrum and to teach children that kicking and screaming is not the way to get what they want.
After the tantrum is over talk about what it is they wanted and stress using words, not hands and feet to ask for it.

In brief: A new TipTap

During tantrums such as these make sure your child is safe (ie: put them in their crib) and then ignore the behavior. This is the best way to stop the tantrum and to teach children that kicking and screaming is not the way to get what they want.
After the tantrum is over talk about what it is they wanted and stress using words, not hands and feet to ask for it.
Dr. Laura Webb
Dr. Laura Webb
Thank
Dr. Charlene Sojico
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Look him in the

Eyes and tell him you will be waiting in the kitchen after his time out ( meaning when he is calm).
Walk away. Do not stay in the fight.Ignore him and walk away as he tries to pull you back in the fighting ring!

In brief: Look him in the

Eyes and tell him you will be waiting in the kitchen after his time out ( meaning when he is calm).
Walk away. Do not stay in the fight.Ignore him and walk away as he tries to pull you back in the fighting ring!
Dr. Charlene Sojico
Dr. Charlene Sojico
Thank
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral
2 doctors agree

In brief: If your son is a

Typically-developing 18-month-old or >, he can respond to time-out.
Pick him up from behind, walk him to his calm-down corner. Don't talk, make eye contact or show anger. Repeat as many times as he gets up +1. Set the timer 1 min/yr. When he stays put. His behavior will get worse at first, as he'll try to get you to engage, till he knows he'll get no negative or positive attention for tantrums.

In brief: If your son is a

Typically-developing 18-month-old or >, he can respond to time-out.
Pick him up from behind, walk him to his calm-down corner. Don't talk, make eye contact or show anger. Repeat as many times as he gets up +1. Set the timer 1 min/yr. When he stays put. His behavior will get worse at first, as he'll try to get you to engage, till he knows he'll get no negative or positive attention for tantrums.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
2 comments
Dr. Charlene Sojico
Look him in d eye,tell him U wl be waiting in the kitchen when he is calm and ready to talk, then walk away.ignore if he tries to pull u in.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Good point. Don't stand near him while you're avoiding eye contact & resisting the urge to say something.
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Ignore bad stuff.

Remember that a major part of a toddler's behavior pattern involves gaining attention.
Toddlers don't much care if that attentiois good attention or bad attention. Behaviors that gain attention get repeating, so trying to explain why kicking hurts and feelings and such may only increase the behavior. A short, quick 'no' and then put them down and remove attention is the best routine at this age.

In brief: Ignore bad stuff.

Remember that a major part of a toddler's behavior pattern involves gaining attention.
Toddlers don't much care if that attentiois good attention or bad attention. Behaviors that gain attention get repeating, so trying to explain why kicking hurts and feelings and such may only increase the behavior. A short, quick 'no' and then put them down and remove attention is the best routine at this age.
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Thank
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