9 doctors weighed in:

My child throws himself on the floor and pounds his fists. How should I respond?

9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics
6 doctors agree

In brief: A new TipTap

As my collegues point out, children communicate as best they are able.
And sometimes the innate behavior is a tantrum. Hese are done to obtain a goal which includes attention.Ignoring teaches the child that this will not work. After the tantrum is over, give a hug to reinforce the " good" behavior.

In brief: A new TipTap

As my collegues point out, children communicate as best they are able.
And sometimes the innate behavior is a tantrum. Hese are done to obtain a goal which includes attention.Ignoring teaches the child that this will not work. After the tantrum is over, give a hug to reinforce the " good" behavior.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Dr. Mark Diamond
Thank
Dr. Laura Webb
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Ignore behavior

Ignoring the behavior (even though i know thats really hard!) is the best thing to do.
Children often misbehave in order to get attention- good or bad attention, so don't give them any and the behavior will start to lessen. Make sure your child is safe and then ignore the tantrum.

In brief: Ignore behavior

Ignoring the behavior (even though i know thats really hard!) is the best thing to do.
Children often misbehave in order to get attention- good or bad attention, so don't give them any and the behavior will start to lessen. Make sure your child is safe and then ignore the tantrum.
Dr. Laura Webb
Dr. Laura Webb
Thank
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Ignore behavior

I agree with dr webb.
Be aware that young children do not understand peripheral vision. You can follow everything they're doing out of the corner of your eye & as long as you don't lock on eyes, they don't realize you're monitoring them. You can even approach them &move them away from a dangerous spot without them understanding what you are doing.Fits that don't pay off eventually stop.

In brief: Ignore behavior

I agree with dr webb.
Be aware that young children do not understand peripheral vision. You can follow everything they're doing out of the corner of your eye & as long as you don't lock on eyes, they don't realize you're monitoring them. You can even approach them &move them away from a dangerous spot without them understanding what you are doing.Fits that don't pay off eventually stop.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral

In brief: When he's calm, tell

him at his language level that when he tantrums, you will pick him up from behind without talking, making eye contact, or acting angry & place him in time-out.
Follow thru immediately. Repeat till he stays put, then set timer for 1min./yr. of age. Walk him out of t.o. the same way. Tantrums will 1st escalate in an attempt to get attention, then extinguish if you consustently ignore them till gone.

In brief: When he's calm, tell

him at his language level that when he tantrums, you will pick him up from behind without talking, making eye contact, or acting angry & place him in time-out.
Follow thru immediately. Repeat till he stays put, then set timer for 1min./yr. of age. Walk him out of t.o. the same way. Tantrums will 1st escalate in an attempt to get attention, then extinguish if you consustently ignore them till gone.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Johanna Fricke
You didn't state his age. Use the developmental screens & M-CHAT on firstsigns.org. Take the results to his doctor, your state's Early Intervention Program if < 3, or your local school district if 3-5 if screens indicate delays. Teach him an acceptable way to express frustration verbally & show him how you expect him to self-calm. If 5 or >, seek referral to a behavioral therapist.
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