8 doctors weighed in:
How do I handle tantrums?
8 doctors weighed in

Dr. Lisa Roberts
Pediatrics
4 doctors agree
In brief: Ignore, or time outs
Oftentimes if you ignore a toddler's tantrums, they will self-resolve as the child realizes he/she receives neither positive nor negative feedback in response to them. Also, the time-out technique (1 minute for every 1 year of age) may be beneficial for getting rid of tantrums and other negative behaviors (hitting, biting, etc) in young children.
Whichever method you use, consistency is important.

In brief: Ignore, or time outs
Oftentimes if you ignore a toddler's tantrums, they will self-resolve as the child realizes he/she receives neither positive nor negative feedback in response to them. Also, the time-out technique (1 minute for every 1 year of age) may be beneficial for getting rid of tantrums and other negative behaviors (hitting, biting, etc) in young children.
Whichever method you use, consistency is important.
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Dr. Lisa Roberts
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1 comment
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Effective ignoring means no eye contact, no talking, no angry expression. Walk an 18- month to 10-year old into time out from behind. Repeat till child remains in time-out, then set timer. Walk child out of time-out the same way. Expect an " extinction burst" or "escalation", an attempt to engage you. Ignore consistently & the behavior will " extinguish."
Dr. Laura Webb
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Try to ignore them
Tantrums are usually a child's way of trying to get attention.
The best way to stop these is to ignore them- that way you aren't giving the child what they want. Make sure your child is safe, but ignore the behavior. If they are in a dangerous situation/place, remove them and then ignore the behavior. Try not to give in to what they want just to stop the tantrum- this will reinforce the behavior.

In brief: Try to ignore them
Tantrums are usually a child's way of trying to get attention.
The best way to stop these is to ignore them- that way you aren't giving the child what they want. Make sure your child is safe, but ignore the behavior. If they are in a dangerous situation/place, remove them and then ignore the behavior. Try not to give in to what they want just to stop the tantrum- this will reinforce the behavior.
Dr. Laura Webb
Dr. Laura Webb
Thank
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral
In brief: Teach the child what
behavior you expect at his language level & eye level, the immediate reward for compliance & the immediate consequence for non-compliance.
When he tantrums, walk him into time-out from behind without talking or making eye contact. Repeat till he stays put, then set the timer. Tantrums will escalate at first in an attempt to engage you, then stop if you've ignored them consistently..

In brief: Teach the child what
behavior you expect at his language level & eye level, the immediate reward for compliance & the immediate consequence for non-compliance.
When he tantrums, walk him into time-out from behind without talking or making eye contact. Repeat till he stays put, then set the timer. Tantrums will escalate at first in an attempt to engage you, then stop if you've ignored them consistently..
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics
In brief: Time out
I agree with dr roberts except that for a tantrum time out, i place the child in a safe place until they are done.
Then i immediately give them a reassuring hug, emphasizing good behavior. This may take 1, 2 or 10 minutes. This teaches the child of any age that controlling the tantrum brings rewards.

In brief: Time out
I agree with dr roberts except that for a tantrum time out, i place the child in a safe place until they are done.
Then i immediately give them a reassuring hug, emphasizing good behavior. This may take 1, 2 or 10 minutes. This teaches the child of any age that controlling the tantrum brings rewards.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Dr. Mark Diamond
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Interesting. I was taught to walk kids out of time-out from behind to the room where the tantrum occurred, engage the child positively, then praise "good" behavior, so (s)he doesn't think (s)he's being rewarded for having been in time out. I s'pose you could say, " Good job calming down!" The old immediate Antecedent, Behavior, immediate Consequence. No recriminations, for sure! ,
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