7 doctors weighed in:

What substances are injected during sclerotherapy? Varicose veins on my feet have me looking into sclerotherapy. I have a lot of allergies, including several antibiotics and a lot of skin care products. Does anyone ever experience a reaction from the prod

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ted King
Phlebology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Sclerosant allergies

See dr. Andrews" answer. It is excellent.
Sotradecol and polidocanol don't cross react with any antibiotics so there really isn't any increased risk in having sc;lerotherapy if you are allergic to antibibiotics. Generally any kind of kind to sclerotherapy is rare. Hypertonic saline also causes no allergic reactions but injecting it is often painful and doesn't work very well. To be cont.

In brief: Sclerosant allergies

See dr. Andrews" answer. It is excellent.
Sotradecol and polidocanol don't cross react with any antibiotics so there really isn't any increased risk in having sc;lerotherapy if you are allergic to antibibiotics. Generally any kind of kind to sclerotherapy is rare. Hypertonic saline also causes no allergic reactions but injecting it is often painful and doesn't work very well. To be cont.
Dr. Ted King
Dr. Ted King
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Ted King
I wquld urge extreme caution in considering treating feet veins. These veins, although prominent, are generally normal and should be left alone. There are safer ways than sclero to make you feet veins less prominent if you are absolutely set on doing that. If you want to pursue treatment, get more than one opinion.
Dr. John Landi
Phlebology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Multiple agents.

There are many types of sclerosing solutions but the most common used currently are called detergents because they can be foamed like a soap.
The foam is thicker and works more efficiently. The common solutions that foam are tetra decal sulfate (tetradecyl) and polidocanol (asclera). Other agents are Hypertonic Saline and glycerine. Polidocanol and glycerine have minimum side effects.

In brief: Multiple agents.

There are many types of sclerosing solutions but the most common used currently are called detergents because they can be foamed like a soap.
The foam is thicker and works more efficiently. The common solutions that foam are tetra decal sulfate (tetradecyl) and polidocanol (asclera). Other agents are Hypertonic Saline and glycerine. Polidocanol and glycerine have minimum side effects.
Dr. John Landi
Dr. John Landi
Thank
Dr. Robert Andrews
Radiology - Interventional
1 doctor agrees

In brief: The

The most common agents used in the us are sodium tetradecyl sulfate and polidochanol.
Both are classified as detergents, which means that their molecular structure consist of chains that bond to water at one end and to oil at the other. They work by damaging the cells that line the veins, which in turn causes the walls to scar together and close the vein. Another agent is called hypertonic saline, which is basically salt water. Like the other agents (though by a different chemical process, Hypertonic Saline damages the cells that line the vein and causes the vein to scar closed. Of these three agents, polidochanol seems to have the best safety profile, but it's newer in the us and may be the most expensive. Hypertonic saline is the cheapest and most readily available, but it causes some crampy pain when injected and does not work well in larger veins.

In brief: The

The most common agents used in the us are sodium tetradecyl sulfate and polidochanol.
Both are classified as detergents, which means that their molecular structure consist of chains that bond to water at one end and to oil at the other. They work by damaging the cells that line the veins, which in turn causes the walls to scar together and close the vein. Another agent is called hypertonic saline, which is basically salt water. Like the other agents (though by a different chemical process, Hypertonic Saline damages the cells that line the vein and causes the vein to scar closed. Of these three agents, polidochanol seems to have the best safety profile, but it's newer in the us and may be the most expensive. Hypertonic saline is the cheapest and most readily available, but it causes some crampy pain when injected and does not work well in larger veins.
Dr. Robert Andrews
Dr. Robert Andrews
Thank
Dr. Timothy Mountcastle
Surgery - Plastics

In brief: Asclera and

Sotradecol are the only ones that are fda approved.
Both are in the detergent class. Both are safe but minor local reactions can happen. Allergies although rare could technically happen.

In brief: Asclera and

Sotradecol are the only ones that are fda approved.
Both are in the detergent class. Both are safe but minor local reactions can happen. Allergies although rare could technically happen.
Dr. Timothy Mountcastle
Dr. Timothy Mountcastle
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Buck Parker
Board Certified, Surgery
13 years in practice
467K people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors