Dear doctor, could you give me the median survival in early 80, s for elderly acute lymphoblastic leukemia, ? I I am having difficulty finding these statistics. Are we making any progress in the elderly with this type of leukemia? Thanks in advance.

Not too good... Age older than 60 years is one of the adverse prognostic indicators for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The presence of the philadelphia chromosome, mll gene rearrangement, WBC over 100, 000/microliter, and failure to achieve remission after 4 weeks of therapy are other poor prognostic factors. Overall, only 20-40% of adults are cured and these are usually the ones without adverse factors.
ALL. Unfortunately the survival for elderly patients with all is limited due to the intensity of the therapy needed. Patients with philadelphia chromosome positive disease may respond well to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Without further details it is difficult to answer thus question but the survival average is generally less than 1 year for somebody in their 80's.

Related Questions

Could you give me the median survival for the elderly, over 65, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia? Also, what was it 30 yrs. Ago? I lost a loved one in 1982, wondering if life expectancy improving in this age group? I'm not sure what the life expectancy w

Modern . Modern therapy is expected to get 60 - 80% of adults with all into remission. Unfortunately, with standard chemotherapy alone only 30-40% of adult all patients live more than 2 years. This likely compares to a 20-30% long-term survival rate in the early 1980s. Much more significant improvements have been made in the treatment of children with all with long-term survival in over 80% of kids with the disease. We now know much more about the genetic abnormalities in the cancer cells than we did in the 1980's and can better predict a patient's prognosis and tailor treatment for them. In particular, outcomes are now much better for mature b-cell all and there are targeted agents available for treating philadelphia chromosome-positive disease as well. Age continues to be a poor prognostic factor with people over 50 not fairing as well as younger adult patients. Read more...
Not too good... Age older than 60 years is one of the adverse prognostic indicators for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The presence of the philadelphia chromosome, mll gene rearrangement, WBC over 100, 000/microliter, and failure to achieve remission after 4 weeks of therapy are other poor prognostic factors. Overall, only 20-40% of adults are cured and these are usually the ones without adverse factors. Read more...

Whats the expected survival rate in a 19 male with (all) acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Need more info. Prognosis in all is still very good in young adults when treated with aggressive chemotherapy (and possibly radiation). One of the most powerful prognostic features is cytogenetics (e.g. Philadelphia chromosome, mll, and tel/aml1). T versus b cell, CNS involvement, response to initial chemo, all give additional information. Read more...

Hi please give me any information u know about alternative acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment in mexico?

Unknown. I would strongly suggest not using alternative treatments outside the country if your disease has not been previously treated. There is no published data suggesting that alternative therapies are advantageous. Speak with your physician prior to embarking on any such alternative treatment. Consider speaking with cancer centers of america for additional treatment ideas. Read more...
They do not work... Unfortunately alternative medicines do not work in leukemia, or other cancers for that matter. There are many doctors and other "health care providers" that offer alternative treatment to cancer patients, many times in other countries to side-step laws protecting patients. I would be very wary of these treatments. Most are out to make money, not help patients. Read more...
Cruel scams. Forgive me. These fake clinics have been around for decades. These people prey on the vain hopes and fears of people in crisis. The proprietors claim to be persecuted geniuses and humanitarians. When the Rx's fail, they'll blame you. ("If only you hadn't eaten junk food.") They bring money into Mexico so the government tolerates them. Would you go there to buy anything else of real value? Read more...

I have a son who is getting treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. I want to plan for a second child but am afraid if he also gets the same?????

ALL in sibling. There is an increased risk of a sibling developing ALL. I would discuss everything with a geneticist and allow them to give you specific numbers. Also, the positive side is that a sibling creates a close possible bone marrow (stem cell) match. Be sure if you do go ahead with a second pregnancy, to harvest stem cells. Read more...

Could you tell me about acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children?

See below. It is a blood cancer in children. With advances in the treatment the prognosis has improved quite a bit. It used to be universally fatal disease about 15 years ago but now most children survive and get cured. Read more...
See below... The most common type of cancer in childhood is leukemia. The most common pediatric leukemia is acute lymphoblastic leukemia, more specifically b-all. The patient needs to be in the care of a pediatric oncologist. The prognosis depends on many factors, one of the most important ones being the genetic abnormality, but is many times very good in children with cure rates at about 80-90%, even higher. Read more...

What are the symptoms of having high risk b-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Fatigue, anemia... Are common, other symptoms include bruising or an infection. The symptoms are caused by low blood counts (the leukemia cells suppress bone marrow production of normal blood cells like red cells, white cells, platelets). The symptoms don't tell you that someone is 'high risk' or 'b-precursor'--you need special lab tests of the cells and bone marrow to determine that. Read more...

I've got all or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. How can an adult get a childhood cancer?

Adults get it too. While acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all) is the most common cancer in children, adults get it also. In fact, more adults each year are diagnosed with all than children. It is usually more difficult to treat when it occurs in adults compared to children. Read more...