2 doctors weighed in:

Should fibroid be removed? I have had a large fibroid for 10 + years which i didn't have removed because it didn't cause symptoms.It has stabilized since going through menopause 2 years ago. Does it have to be removed?

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ely Brand
Gynecology - Oncology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Asymptomatic

Asymptomatic fibroids do not need surgery with few exceptions.
1. Growing after menopause. Remove because of risk of sarcoma. Sarcomas are very rare and grow rapidly. Pre-existing fibroids do not develop into sarcoma. 2. Blockage of the kidneys. This can occur without symptoms, and is detected by ultrasound of the kidneys, which can easily be done during pelvic ultrasound. 3. Blockage of blood low from the legs, usually if not always a symptom, since one leg will swell. 4. Patients at risk of ovarian cancer when the ovaries cannot be palpated on exam or seen on ultrasound. This is a soft call since it is not clear that pelvic exam or ultrasound detects ovarian cancer without symptoms, but I have saved a few women from advanced cancer by sticking to this rule.

In brief: Asymptomatic

Asymptomatic fibroids do not need surgery with few exceptions.
1. Growing after menopause. Remove because of risk of sarcoma. Sarcomas are very rare and grow rapidly. Pre-existing fibroids do not develop into sarcoma. 2. Blockage of the kidneys. This can occur without symptoms, and is detected by ultrasound of the kidneys, which can easily be done during pelvic ultrasound. 3. Blockage of blood low from the legs, usually if not always a symptom, since one leg will swell. 4. Patients at risk of ovarian cancer when the ovaries cannot be palpated on exam or seen on ultrasound. This is a soft call since it is not clear that pelvic exam or ultrasound detects ovarian cancer without symptoms, but I have saved a few women from advanced cancer by sticking to this rule.
Dr. Ely Brand
Dr. Ely Brand
Thank
Dr. Ely Brand
Gynecology - Oncology

In brief: Asymptomatic

Asymptomatic fibroids do not need surgery with few exceptions.
1. Growing after menopause. Remove because of risk of sarcoma. Sarcomas are very rare and grow rapidly. Pre-existing fibroids do not develop into sarcoma. 2. Blockage of the kidneys. This can occur without symptoms, and is detected by ultrasound of the kidneys, which can easily be done during pelvic ultrasound. 3. Blockage of blood low from the legs, usually if noy always a symptom since one leg will swell. 4. Patients at risk of ovarian cancer when the ovaries cannot be palpated on exam or seen on ultrasound. This is a soft call since it is not clear that pelvic exam or ultrasound detects ovarian cancer without symptoms, but I have saved a few women from advanced cancer by sticking to this rule.

In brief: Asymptomatic

Asymptomatic fibroids do not need surgery with few exceptions.
1. Growing after menopause. Remove because of risk of sarcoma. Sarcomas are very rare and grow rapidly. Pre-existing fibroids do not develop into sarcoma. 2. Blockage of the kidneys. This can occur without symptoms, and is detected by ultrasound of the kidneys, which can easily be done during pelvic ultrasound. 3. Blockage of blood low from the legs, usually if noy always a symptom since one leg will swell. 4. Patients at risk of ovarian cancer when the ovaries cannot be palpated on exam or seen on ultrasound. This is a soft call since it is not clear that pelvic exam or ultrasound detects ovarian cancer without symptoms, but I have saved a few women from advanced cancer by sticking to this rule.
Dr. Ely Brand
Dr. Ely Brand
Thank
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